May 31, 2014

RhoDeo 1421 Grooves

Hello, leaving the Beats be for now and swiching over to another style of beats, one that preceded our digital age,  the groove...".


The coming weeks it's all about "Soul Brother Number One," "the Godfather of Soul," "the Hardest Working Man in Show Business," "Mr. Dynamite" -- those are mighty titles, but no one can question that today's artist earned them more than any other performer. Other singers were more popular, others were equally skilled, but few other African-American musicians were so influential over the course of popular music. And no other musician, pop or otherwise, put on a more exciting, exhilarating stage show: his performances were marvels of athletic stamina and split-second timing. He is ranked seventh on the music magazine Rolling Stone's list of its 100 greatest artists of all time......N'joy

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Through the gospel-impassioned fury of his vocals and the complex polyrhythms of his beats, Brown was a crucial midwife in not just one, but two revolutions in black American music. He was one of the figures most responsible for turning R&B into soul and he was, most would agree, the figure most responsible for turning soul music into the funk of the late '60s and early '70s. After the mid-'70s, he did little more than tread water artistically; his financial and drug problems eventually got him a controversial prison sentence. Yet in a sense, his music is now more influential than ever, as his voice and rhythms have been sampled on innumerable hip-hop recordings, and critics have belatedly hailed his innovations as among the most important in all of rock or soul.

Brown's rags-to-riches-to-rags story has heroic and tragic dimensions of mythic resonance. Born into poverty in the South, he ran afoul of the law by the late '40s on an armed robbery conviction. With the help of singer Bobby Byrd's family, Brown gained parole and started a gospel group with Byrd, changing their focus to R&B as the rock revolution gained steam. The Flames, as the Georgian group was known in the mid-'50s, signed to Federal/King and had a huge R&B hit right off the bat with the wrenching, churchy ballad "Please, Please, Please." By that point, The Flames had become James Brown & the Famous Flames; the charisma, energy, and talent of Brown made him the natural star attraction.

 All of Brown's singles over the next two years flopped, as he sought to establish his own style, recording material that was obviously derivative of heroes like Roy Brown, Hank Ballard, Little Richard, and Ray Charles. In retrospect, it can be seen that Brown was in the same position as dozens of other R&B one-shot: talented singers in need of better songs, or not fully on the road to a truly original sound. What made Brown succeed where hundreds of others failed was his superhuman determination, working the chitlin circuit to death, sharpening his band, and keeping an eye on new trends. He was on the verge of being dropped from King in late 1958 when his perseverance finally paid off, as "Try Me" became a number one R&B (and small pop) hit, and several follow-ups established him as a regular visitor to the R&B charts.

Brown's style of R&B got harder as the '60s began; he added more complex, Latin- and jazz-influenced rhythms on hits like "Good Good Lovin'," "I'll Go Crazy," "Think," and "Night Train," alternating these with torturous ballads that featured some of the most frayed screaming to be heard outside of the church. Black audiences already knew that Brown had the most exciting live act around, but he truly started to become a phenomenon with the release of Live at the Apollo in 1963. Capturing a James Brown concert in all its whirling-dervish energy and calculated spontaneity, the album reached number two on the album charts, an unprecedented feat for a hardcore R&B LP.

Live at the Apollo was recorded and released against the wishes of the King label. It was this kind of artistic standoff that led Brown to seek better opportunities elsewhere. In 1964, he ignored his King contract to record "Out of Sight" for Smash, igniting a lengthy legal battle that prevented him from issuing vocal recordings for about a year. When he finally resumed recording for King in 1965, he had a new contract that granted him far more artistic control over his releases.

Brown's new era had truly begun, however, with "Out of Sight," which topped the R&B charts and made the pop Top 40. For some time, Brown had been moving toward more elemental lyrics that threw in as many chants and screams as they did words, and more intricate beats and horn charts that took some of their cues from the ensemble work of jazz outfits. "Out of Sight" wasn't called funk when it came out, but it had most of the essential ingredients. These were amplified and perfected on 1965's "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag," a monster that finally broke Brown to the white audience, reaching the Top Ten. The even more adventurous follow-up, "I Got You (I Feel Good)," did even better, making number three.

 These hits kicked off Brown's period of greatest commercial success and public visibility. From 1965 to the end of the decade, he was rarely off the R&B charts, often on the pop listings, and all over the concert circuit and national television, even meeting with Vice President Hubert Humphrey and other important politicians as a representative of the black community. His music became even bolder and funkier, as melody was dispensed with almost altogether in favor of chunky rhythms and magnetic interplay between his vocals, horns, drums, and scratching electric guitar (heard to best advantage on hits like "Cold Sweat," "I Got the Feelin'," and "There Was a Time"). The lyrics were not so much words as chanted, stream-of-consciousness slogans, often aligning themselves with black pride as well as good old-fashioned (or new-fashioned) sex. Much of the credit for the sound he devised belonged to (and has now been belatedly attributed to) his top-notch supporting musicians such as saxophonists Maceo Parker, St. Clair Pinckney, and Pee Wee Ellis; guitarist Jimmy Nolen; backup singer and longtime loyal associate Bobby Byrd; and drummer Clyde Stubblefield.

Brown was both a brilliant bandleader and a stern taskmaster, the latter leading his band to walk out on him in late 1969. Amazingly, he turned the crisis to his advantage by recruiting a young Cincinnati outfit called the Pacemakers featuring guitarist Catfish Collins and bassist Bootsy Collins. Although they only stayed with him for about a year, they were crucial to Brown's evolution into even harder funk, emphasizing the rhythm and the bottom even more. The Collins brothers, for their part, put their apprenticeship to good use, helping define '70s funk as members of the Parliament-Funkadelic axis.

 In the early '70s, many of the most important members of Brown's late-'60s band returned to the fold, to be billed as the J.B.'s (they also made records on their own). Brown continued to score heavily on the R&B charts throughout the first half of the '70s, the music becoming more and more elemental and beat-driven. At the same time, he was retreating from the white audience he had cultivated during the mid- to late '60s; records like "Make It Funky," "Hot Pants," "Get on the Good Foot," and "The Payback" were huge soul sellers, but only modest pop ones. Critics charged, with some justification, that the Godfather was starting to repeat and recycle himself too many times. It must be remembered, though, that these songs were made for the singles radio jukebox market and not meant to be played one after the other on CD compilations (as they are today).

By the mid-'70s, Brown was beginning to burn out artistically. He seemed shorn of new ideas, was being out-gunned on the charts by disco, and was running into problems with the IRS and his financial empire. There were sporadic hits, and he could always count on enthusiastic live audiences, but by the '80s, he didn't have a label. With the explosion of rap, however, which frequently sampled vintage J.B.'s records, Brown became hipper than ever. He collaborated with Afrika Bambaataa on the critical smash single "Unity" and reentered the Top Ten in 1986 with "Living in America." Rock critics, who had always ranked Brown considerably below Otis Redding and Aretha Franklin in the soul canon, began to reevaluate his output, particularly the material from his funk years, sometimes anointing him not just "Soul Brother Number One," but the most important black musician of the rock era.

For the majority of his career, Brown carried around a strict drug and alcohol-free policy with any member in his entourage, including band members, firing people who disobeyed orders, particularly those who used or abused drugs and alcohol. Some members of Brown's vocal group the Famous Flames were fired due to alcohol use. Noting of the policy, some of the original members of Brown's 1970s band, The J.B.'s, including Catfish and Bootsy Collins, intentionally got high on LSD during a concert gig in 1971, causing Brown to fire them after the show because he had suspected them to be on drugs all along.

However, by the mid-1980s, it was alleged that Brown himself was using drugs. After meeting and later marrying Adrienne Rodriguez, she and Brown began using PCP ("angel dust"). The drug resulted in domestically violent outbursts from Brown and he was arrested several times for domestic violence against Rodriguez while high on the drug. Clearly Adrienne Rodriguez had a bad influence on him and his brain couldn't cope with drugs. In 1988, Brown's personal life came crashing down in a well-publicized incident in which he was accused by his wife of assault and battery. After a year skirting hazy legal and personal troubles, he led the police on an interstate car chase after allegedly threatening people with a handgun. The episode ended in a six-year prison sentence that many felt was excessive; he was paroled after serving two years.

Throughout the '90s Brown continued to perform and release new material like Love Over-Due (1991), Universal James (1992), and I'm Back (1998). While none of these recordings could be considered as important as his earlier work and did little to increase his popularity, his classic catalog became more popular in the American mainstream during this time than it had been since the '70s, and not just among young rappers and samplers. One of the main reasons for this was a proper presentation of his recorded legacy. For a long time, his cumbersome, byzantine discography was mostly out of print, with pieces available only on skimpy greatest-hits collections. A series of exceptionally well-packaged reissues on PolyGram changed that situation; the Star Time box set is the best overview, with other superb compilations devoted to specific phases of his lengthy career, from '50s R&B to '70s funk.

 In 2004, Brown was diagnosed with prostate cancer but successfully fought the disease. By 2006, it was in remission and Brown, then 73, began a global tour dubbed the Seven Decades of Funk World Tour. Late in the year while at a routine dentist appointment, the singer was diagnosed with pneumonia. On December 25, 2006, Brown died at approximately 1:45 am EST (06:45 UTC) from congestive heart failure resulting from complications of pneumonia, at age 73, with his personal manager and longtime friend Charles Bobbit at his bedside. According to Mr. Bobbit, Brown stuttered "I'm going away tonight", and then Brown took three long, quiet breaths and fell asleep before dying.

After Brown's death, Brown's relatives and friends, a host of celebrities and thousands of fans attended public memorial services at the Apollo Theater in New York on December 28, 2006 and at the James Brown Arena on December 30, 2006 in Augusta, Georgia. A separate, private memorial service was also held in North Augusta, South Carolina on December 29, 2006, which was attended by Brown's family and close friends. Celebrities who attended Brown's public and/or private memorial services included Michael Jackson, Jimmy Cliff, Joe Frazier, Buddy Guy, Ice Cube, Ludacris, Dr. Dre, Little Richard, Dick Gregory, MC Hammer, Prince, Jesse Jackson, Ice-T, Jerry Lee Lewis, Bootsy Collins, LL Cool J, Li'l Wayne, Lenny Kravitz, 50 Cent, Stevie Wonder, and Don King, among others.


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James Brown recorded the pet project Gettin' Down to It in Cincinnati, OH, at King Studios, between December 1968 and March 1969. Although you can't tell by the album's title, it reflects Soul Brother Number One momentarily stepping back from the fiery racial and political atmosphere of the times. Following the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr., the riots sparked by that event, and his calming effect on it, Mr. Dynamite replaced "Say It Loud (I'm Black and I'm Proud)" with his love of standards utilizing the melancholy phrasing of his favorite male vocalist, Frank Sinatra. Aided by the acoustic piano trio led by Dee Felice, Brown tackles such romantic chestnuts as "Strangers in the Night," "That's Life," "It Had to Be You," "Willow Weep for Me," and "All the Way." Although laid-back could be applied to the album's overall tone, these 12 tracks are by no means "mellow." After all, this is James Brown! For instance, "(I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons," clocking in at 7:40, combines pianist Frank Vincent's percussive vamping with James testifying as if he had this tune confused with "Ain't It Funky Now." While the disc is made up of mainly standards, that doesn't stop Brown from including two of his compositions, "Cold Sweat" and an instrumental take of "There Was a Time," reworked to fit the album's easygoing mood with jazzy elements intact. Even though there aren't any bonus tracks, this Verve reissue does include the original packaging and liner notes with Marc Eliot's insightful addendum tacked on. A curious entry in the James Brown catalog, Gettin' Down to It is a savory listen.



James Brown - Gettin' Down To It (flac 301mb)

01 Sunny 3:17
02 That's Life 4:29
03 Strangers In The Night 3:26
04 Willow Weep For Me 4:39
05 Cold Sweat 5:02
06 There Was A Time 2:59
07 Chicago 2:51
08 (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons 7:51
09 Time After Time 4:49
10 All The Way 3:40
11 It Had To Be You 2:42
12 Uncle 2:35

James Brown - Gettin' Down To It (ogg 113mb)

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Although historical evaluations of James Brown's work during the last half of the '60s tend to focus on the innovative funk of his biggest hit singles, his repertoire -- both live and on record -- in fact remained pretty versatile. Like his other '60s studio albums, Say It Loud - I'm Black and I'm Proud is more R&B/pop-conscious than a lot of listeners would expect, mixing the funky monsters "Say It Loud (I'm Black and I'm Proud)" and "Licking Stick" with soul ballads. It's a notch above similar albums from earlier in the decade, however, in that the slow numbers are usually gritty slow-burns that eschew syrupy orchestration.



James Brown - Say It Loud, I'm Black And I'm Proud  (flac 208mb)

01 Say It Loud - I'm Black And I'm Proud (Parts 1 & 2) 4:46
02 I Guess I'll Have To Cry, Cry, Cry 3:33
03 Goodbye My Love (Parts 1 & 2) 5:31
04 Shades Of Brown 2:45
05 Licking Stick 2:52
06 I Love You 3:33
07 Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye 3:52
08 Let Them Talk 4:01
09 Maybe I'll Understand 3:17
10 I'll Lose My Mind 2:44

James Brown - Say It Loud, I'm Black And I'm Proud  (ogg 84mb)

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This live outing from Brown's seminal 1970 J.B.'s lineup features Bootsy Collins, Clyde Stubblefield, Fred Wesley, Maceo Parker, Bobby Byrd, and many more. While it's a cut below Love Power Peace in documenting this lineup live, Brown and his band still smoke, tearing into extended versions of funk classics like "Sex Machine" (nearly 11 minutes), "Brother Rapp," "Give It Up or Turnit a Loose," and "Mother Popcorn," plus a healthy quotient of earlier soul material sprinkled in between. Sex Machine purports to be a live recording. However, the first LP's worth of material consists of tracks recorded in studio settings with added reverberation and overdubbed applause (some of which subsequently were released in unadulterated mixes, most notably on the 1996 Funk Power compilation CD.). All but one track of the second LP apparently were recorded live in concert in Brown's hometown of Augusta, Georgia, although this material, too, features added reverb and overdubbed applause.

Sex Machine was ranked 96th in a 2005 survey held by British television's Channel 4 to determine the 100 greatest albums of all time



James Brown - Sex Machine (flac 410mb)

01 Get Up I Feel Like Being A Sex Machine 10:48
02 Brother Rapp (Parts I & II) 5:09
medley
03 Bewildered 6:09
04 I Got The Feelin' 1:07
05 Give It Up Or Turnit A Loose 6:26

06 I Don't Want Nobody To Give Me Nothing (Open Up The Door I'll Get It Myself) 4:31
07 Licking Stick - Licking Stick 1:19
08 Lowdown Popcorn 3:25
09 Spinning Wheel 4:02
10 If I Ruled The World 4:03
11 There Was A Time 4:04
12 It's A Man's Man's Man's World 3:42
13 Please, Please, Please 2:26
14 I Can't Stand Myself (When You Touch Me) 1:28
15 Mother Popcorn 5:50

James Brown - Sex Machine  (ogg 150mb)

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May 29, 2014

RhoDeo 1421 Goldy Rhox 162

Hello, today the 162nd post of Goldy Rhox, classic pop rock in the darklight  is an American singer, songwriter and guitarist (born June 8, 1944) He gained fame in the 1960s as a guitarist and sometime lead singer with the Steve Miller Band, and in the 1970s with several solo Top 20 hit singles in the United States, including the well-known hits "Lowdown", and "Lido Shuffle".

He was born in Canton, Ohio, the son of a traveling salesman. The family moved to McAlester, Oklahoma, then to Plano, Texas (at that time a farm town), just north of Dallas. He attended a Dallas private school, St. Mark's School of Texas, where schoolmate Mal Buckner gave him the nickname "Bosley"; this was later shortened to "Boz". After learning guitar at the age of 12, he met Steve Miller at St. Mark's School. In 1959, he became the vocalist for Miller's band, the Marksmen. The pair later attended the University of Wisconsin–Madison together, playing in blues bands like the Ardells and the Fabulous Knight Trains. After singing in bands such as the Wigs and Mother Earth, he traveled to Sweden as a solo performer, and in 1965 recorded his solo debut album, Boz, which was not a commercial success.

Returning to the U.S., he promptly headed for the booming psychedelic music center of San Francisco in 1967. Linking up with Steve Miller again, and appeared on the Steve Miller Band's first two albums, Children of the Future and Sailor. Scaggs secured a solo contract with Atlantic Records in 1968, releasing his second album, featuring the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section and session guitarist Duane Allman, in 1969. Despite good reviews, this release achieved only moderate sales. Today's mystery artist moved to Columbia Records; his first five albums for Columbia all charted, but none peaked higher than #81.

In 1976, using session musicians who would later form Toto, he recorded todays mystery album which sold over one million copies in the US. A sellout world tour followed, but his follow-up album in 1977 Down Two Then Left did not sell as well as it predecessor had, and neither of the singles taken from it reached the Top 40. Our man took a long break from recording and his next LP, Other Roads, did not appear until 1988. "Heart of Mine", from Other Roads, is his last Top 40 hit to date. Also in 1988, he opened the San Francisco nightclub, Slim's, and remained a co-owner of the venue as of 2008.

After a break in recording, in 2008, he undertook a series of shows across the US. Two years followed when the performer began a tour with Donald Fagen and Michael McDonald. Together they took the opportunity with concerts entitled Dukes of September Rhythm Revue. He's still releasing albums his latest Memphis is a year old now. Our man and his wife Dominique grow grapes in Napa County, California, and have produced their own wine. One son, Austin is a music journalist with a column called "The Smoking Section" in Rolling Stone. Another son, Oscar, died of a heroin overdose in 1998 at the age of 21.

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.

Today's mystery album is the seventh studio album by our mystery artist released march 1976. The album peaked at #2 and spent 115 weeks on the Billboard 200. It has been certified five times platinum by the RIAA and remains the artists' best selling album. Silk Degrees spawned four singles, of which "It's Over," "Lowdown," and "Lido Shuffle" all made the Top 40. The album was recorded at Davlen Sound Studios and Hollywood Sound Studios, Los Angeles. Among the accompanying musicians, David Paich, Jeff Porcaro, and David Hungate would go on to become band members in Toto. The album marked the artists' commercial zenith, a mix of straight pop rock songs ("Jump Street" and "Lido Shuffle"), smooth soul compositions ("What Can I Say" and "Lowdown") and appealing ballads ("Harbor Lights" and "We're All Alone"). "Lowdown" reached the top 5 on the club play, black, disco and pop charts and also did respectably on the AC chart, with its peak at #3 on the pop chart. It earned a Grammy Award, as the Best R&B Song at the Grammy Awards of 1976, and the song is an airplay staple to this day, particularly on AC, oldies and smooth jazz radio stations. The mystery artists also received Grammy nominations for Album of the Year, Best LP Package, Best Pop Vocal by a Male and Best R&B Vocal Performance by a Male for "Lowdown".

In a contemporary review for The Village Voice, music critic Robert Christgau praised the album as "white soul with a sense of humor that isn't consumed in self-parody." Alex Henderson of music database website Allmusic noted that the mystery artists "hit the R&B charts in a big way with the addictive, sly "Lowdown" [...] and expressed his love of smooth soul music almost as well on the appealing "What Can I Say."" However, Henderson stated that "today's mystery artist was essentially a pop/rocker, and in that area he has a considerable amount of fun". He concluded: "Though not remarkable, the ballads have more heart than most of the bland material dominating that format." Here to get in it's MFSL remaster



Goldy Rhox 162   (flac 250mb)

Goldy Rhox 162   (ogg 96mb)


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May 28, 2014

RhoDeo 1421 Aetix

Hello, as the EU leaders consider how to ignore the EU citizens whilst claiming this isn't business as usual, hatred is taking root against these arrogant we know best politicians, who can do nothing but smere those opposed to them, but not a word on the serious grievances. These corrupt nincompoops are in the busines of selling the EU out to the criminal US multinationals eager to treat the EU public the same way as the US public...like dirt. Should this come to pass Brussels will burn and commissioners will hang! And the EU will dissolve with civil war on the cards for Spain, Belgium and France. Ah yes don't think these nincompoops ego's aren't warned but hey they know what's best (for their bank account).

Meanwhile the worst payed professional sportsmen, race cyclists were forced to ascend 2.7 km high mountains between walls of snow and in a snowdrift the final descent was supposed to be neutralised but not everyone got that message so in the end those who stayed around the pink leader jersey must have felt fools as 3 contenders just went for it and before the final ascend had 3.30 min lead and as these were serious climbers retained most of it and the pink changed hands- another Colombian Quintana is in control now. But as i said these top sportsmen are so underpaid compared to the effort they put in.


Back in the day, before alternative rock was invented and indie rock was still shy of roots music and other folk elements, today's band's merging of punk, folk, ska, and world music was truly a revelation. Singer/songwriter David Lowery's smart-aleck lyrics, delivered in laid-back California style, combined with Jonathan Segel's violin as lead instrument, were the band's instant trademarks. Decades after its inception, the band's sound is still remarkably fresh and their influence on alternative music undeniable and resounding ....N'joy

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Self-described as "surrealist absurdist folk," the group had its beginnings in the summer of 1983 when Lowery and boyhood friend Victor Krummenacher (bass) started playing music together around Riverside and Redlands, California. Upon relocating to the Northern California college town of Santa Cruz, they enlisted friends Chris Pedersen (drums) and Chris Molla (guitar) to join the fold; Greg Lisher (guitar) and Jonathan Segel (violins, keyboards, mandolin) were added in 1985, and collectively they created a repertoire built on acoustic and electric, traditional and punky aesthetics. The reissue of the band's self-released 1985 debut, Telephone Free Landslide Victory, which included their signature song "Take the Skinheads Bowling," made the Top Ten in the 1986 Village Voice Pazz and Jop Poll, as did their second album, the confusingly titled II & III, along with their self-titled third album, both released in 1986. In addition to punk and ska, II & III dabbled in lo-fi sounds, with touches of country (as in the original "Sad Lovers Waltz" and the twangy cover of Sonic Youth's "I Love Her All the Time"). The band's forte was its ability to switch styles, from Balkan folk to psychedelic rock on alternate takes and sometimes even within the same song!

The third album, Camper Van Beethoven, continued the thread, as blueprint CVB tracks like "Joe Stalin's Cadillac" and "Good Guys and Bad Guys" fused punk-inspired looseness with more sophisticated melody and rhythm patterns. At the same time, they were blowing minds and ears with their prog rock leanings (check their nearly note-perfect version of Pink Floyd's "Interstellar Overdrive"). By the time of their Virgin Records debut (coinciding with the label's U.S. re-launch in 1988), the band took a more serious tack for its fourth album, Our Beloved Revolutionary Sweetheart. With Molla gone by then, the group was officially a five-piece, though a cadre of friends assisted them at recording sessions, including producer Dennis Herring (eventually, touring guitarist David Immerglück, later of Counting Crows, became an honorary sixth member). Stretching out in larger studio facilities and experimenting with sound, Sweetheart was the first CVB release met with mixed critical response. Following the elegiac Key Lime Pie and amid creative and personal strife, the band (then featuring female fiddler Morgan Fichter in place of Segel) called it a night in 1989.

In the '90s, Krummenacher, Pedersen, and Lisher (with Immerglück) continued to play together in Monks of Doom, a mostly instrumental prog rock concern, as well as in other formations that sometimes included Segel. Segel released three albums as Hieronymous Firebrain from 1990-1994, and two with Jack & Jill for the Magnetic label. In 2005 he collaborated with Dina Emerson in Chaos Butterfly. Krummenacher has released six solo albums and has collaborated with Eugene Chadbourne, Bruce Kaphan, and members of Tarnation, among others, also released through Magnetic. Lisher has two self-released solo albums to his credit. In the wake of the band's dissolution, Lowery formed Cracker, by far the most successful of the post-Camper ventures; it served as a vehicle to keep him on the road as well as a way to keep Camper's name in circulation, though he kept a distance from his bandmates and left California for Richmond, Virginia.

By 1999, Krummenacher, Segel, and Lowery were reunited while compiling an unorthodox rarities collection, Camper Van Beethoven Is Dead: Long Live Camper Van Beethoven, a mash-up of rare cuts utilizing the band's back catalog. In 2002, they officially issued their song-for-song version of Fleetwood Mac's Tusk, recorded on a lark in 1987. In the process of reissuing and archiving, the original members (sans Pedersen) quietly reunited for a handful of live shows and began work on a new batch of songs. In 2004 they released New Roman Times (a concept album about a Texas teen who joins the military then leaves ranks to join an anti-government militia) featuring all-original members including Pedersen on drums and original guitarist Molla sitting in. In 2008 Cooking Vinyl released Popular Songs of Great Enduring Strength and Beauty, a collection of fan favorites, followed by an all-new studio album, La Costa Perdida, in 2013 and its sister release, El Camino Real, in 2014. CVB continue to tour, often in support of alternative acts who've followed in their groundbreaking indie rock footprints.


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They say "never say never," but it's still extremely unlikely something so goofily low-key, inventive, and fun will ever achieve cult status so quickly again, especially in terms of musical range on display. Not simply a rock group but not anything else, Camper Van Beethoven pulled off a series of entertaining fusions throughout its debut record, as the opening song "Border Ska" indicates by name alone. Eastern European folk, tropical grooves, post-punk atmospherics, country laid-back good times, psych/garage band aesthetics, lyrics about Mao, Greece, and more -- a lot of stuff went into the Santa Cruz band's brew, and most of it came up trumps on Telephone. Lowery's lead vocals aren't much like what his more famous work in Cracker would indicate, being more speak-singing through shaggy dog stories (even one about Lassie) of all stripes. Hearing his tale of woe on "Wasted" -- "I was a punker, and I had a Mohawk/I was so gnarly and I drove my dad's car" -- delivered in a "yeah dude" tone of voice is pretty darn funny. Segel's keyboards and violins color the arrangements with a fun touch, while rhythm team Krummenacher and then recently departed drummer Anthony Guess try out nearly everything at least once. The production is eminently suited for the proceedings, sounding a bit like the thick, fuzzy flow of many Shimmy-Disc releases but with just enough of a crisp edge. When it comes to humor, it's everywhere -- for instance, the plaintively sung chorus of "Where the Hell Is Bill?," not to mention the various speculative answers ("Maybe he went to get a Vespa scooter"). Or, of course, the song that kick-started the band's reputation, "Take the Skinheads Bowling," two and a half minutes of chiming, goofy nonsense with references to Jah and incomplete rhymes.

Musically, the album is a combination of songs and instrumentals. The former are simple garage tunes, with a folk-punk sound and absurdist lyrics, often simultaneously mocking and affectionately celebrating aspects of 1980s underground counterculture, with references to punks, skinheads, surfers, skaters and hippies. These songs are comparable to other humorous 1980s underground bands like The Violent Femmes, The Dead Milkmen and The Young Fresh Fellows. The instrumentals, however, are completely different: they combine ethnic melodies (often Eastern Europe, Mexican or spaghetti Western) played on Segel's violin and Molla's guitar, with ska beats supplied by Guess, Lowery and Krummenacher. The alternation between the instrumentals and songs creates an almost split personality that is one of the most unusual aspects of the record. Later versions of the band would integrate the ethnic influences with the actual songs, but here they are quite separate. The one thing that the two song-types have in common is that they are both quite droll, leading to the band being inaccurately typecast as a novelty group.

Despite the considerable musical growth that the band would show in its later work, Telephone Free Landslide Victory has remained one of its most enduring albums. The reunited Camper Van Beethoven frequently features several of the album's songs in their set lists to this day, including "Take the Skinheads Bowling", the countrified Black Flag cover "Wasted", the hardcore send-up "Club Med Sucks", "The Day That Lassie Went to the Moon", "Ambiguity Song", and several of the instrumentals.



Camper Van Beethoven -  Telephone Free Landslide Victory ( flac 311mb)

01 The Day That Lassie Went To The Moon 3:13
02 Border Ska 2:56
03 Wasted 1:55
04 Yanqui Go Home 2:41
05 Oh No! 1:54
06 9 Of Disks 2:36
07 Payed Vacation: Greece 1:52
08 Where The Hell Is Bill? 2:05
09 Wasting All Your Time 2:59
10 Epigram #5 0:09
11 At Kuda 2:14
12 Epigram #2 0:21
13 Cowboys From Hollywood (Original) 1:41
14 Colonel Enrique Adolfo Bermudez 2:09
15 Vladivostock 2:22
16 Skinhead Stomp 1:47
17 Tina 1:37
18 Take The Skinheads Bowling 2:32
19 Mao Reminisces About His Days In Southern China 1:59
20 I Don't See You 2:23
21 Balalaika Gap 2:13
22 Opi Rides Again 0:50
23 Club Med Sucks 3:05
24 Ambiguity Song 6:23
25 Heart (Remix) 3:07

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After releasing their debut album, original drummer Anthony Guess left the band, and guitarist Greg Lisher joined. With the band temporarily lacking a drummer, guitarist Chris Molla played many of the drum parts on 'II & III', with singer/rhythm guitarist David Lowery playing some of the drum parts as well. As the album was being finished, they finally found a permanent replacement for Guess with Chris Pedersen, who ended up playing on only one song, "We're a Bad Trip." The album also found violinist/multi-instrumentalist Jonathan Segel singing lead vocals for the first time, on the tracks "Chain of Circumstance" and "We're a Bad Trip," the latter which featured him and Lowery trading verses.

II & III found the band already moving past the mixture of faux ethnic instrumentals and absurdist folk-pop-punk tunes of their debut album, for an even more eclectic sound, including elements of Americana, psychedelia, and Middle-Eastern music. Molla played steel guitar on some songs, and Segel played mandolin, adding to the country influences. There are relatively fewer instrumentals, with the vocal songs taking on many of the ethnic elements that were contained on the debut album's instrumental numbers. It contains several notable songs, especially "Sad Lover's Waltz," a slow alt-country number that did much to dispel the band's then-image as a novelty band. Another Americana-style song was a bluegrass-influenced cover of "I Love Her All the Time" by Sonic Youth, which continued the band's traditions of doing countrified versions of punk and alternative songs.



Camper Van Beethoven -  II and III  (flac 341mb)

01 Abundance 1:53
02 Cowboys From Hollywood 1:43
03 Sad Lover's Waltz 4:03
04 Turtlehead 1:16
05 I Love Her All The Time 2:16
06 No Flies On Us 1:46
07 Down And Out 1:35
08 No Krugerrands For David 2:32
09 Goleta 1:21
10 4 Year Plan 1:49
11 Devil Song (Original Version) 2:07
12 Vampire Club 4:11
13 (We're A) Bad Trip 2:32
14 Circles 2:52
15 Dustpan 1:54
16 Sometimes 2:37
17 Chain Of Circumstance 2:27
18 ZZ Top Goes To Egypt 3:07
19 Cattle (Reversed) 2:50
20 Form Another Stone 2:09
21 Circles Dub 2:49
22 (We're A) Bad Trip (Vinyl Version) 2:46
23 No More Bullshit 3:08

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CVB's self-titled third album generally differs little from II & III, continuing the blend of wistfully weird lyrics, any number of musical touches from all over the map and good-time vibes. The opening "Good Guys & Bad Guys" proves that much, with reggae, folk, country and more stewed together as Lowery plaintively sings about lawyers and the people in Russia and the like.

With the six then CVB members joined in the studio by acid-folk eccentric Eugene Chadbourne, the album is arguably the zenith of the band's musical experimentation, with surreal lyrics, backwards, speeded-up and slowed down parts, and a great number of ethnic instruments used. In addition to the usual violin parts played by member Jonathan Segel, the album also features pedal steel, banjo, tablas and sitar. While the album features the band's trademark absurdist lyrics by leader David Lowery and Segel, with CVB staples like affectionate parodies of counterculture and references to drugs and alien abduction, it also features some satirical political lyrics and social commentary on tracks like "Good Guys and Bad Guys", "Joe Stalin's Cadillac" and "We Love You"'.

The songs cover a bewildering range of musical styles: garage punk on "Shut Us Down"', acid-rock jamming on the Pink Floyd cover "Interstellar Overdrive", bluegrass jamming on "Hoe Yourself Down", folk-ska on "Good Guys and Bad Guys", gentle tabla beats on "Une Fois" and "Folly", psychedelic pop on "We Saw Jerry's Daughter", ominous desert-rock spoken word on "Peace and Love" and grinding raga-rock on "Stairway to Heavan" (sic). While earlier CVB albums had featured influences of Eastern European and Mexican musical styles, this album has more noticeable elements of Indian and Arabic musics, done in the usual irreverent Camper style. These combine with the elements of psychedelic music that dominate the album. There are also more elements of Americana than on their previous albums. The American Southwest looms large in the music and lyrics as well, especially on songs like "The History of Utah" and "Peace and Love".

There are a number of classic rock references too: "We Saw Jerry's Daughter" is a parody of Deadheads; "Stairway to Heavan" (sic), "Five Sticks" and "Joe Stalin's Cadillac" all contain song titles or lyrics modified from Led Zeppelin; and the cover of "Interstellar Overdrive" and several of the album's songs are reminiscent of Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd. "We Love You" also contains a parody of the Charlie Daniels Band song "The Devil Went Down to Georgia". In the original "The Devil Went Down to Georgia", the Devil was portrayed as a negative being who is defeated in a fiddle-playing contest by the song's protagonist, but in "We Love You", the devil, presumably Jonathan Segel, so impresses the band with his violin playing that they allow him to become a band member. The classic-rock influences are a contrast from their first two albums, which contained covers of other contemporary underground bands like Sonic Youth and Black Flag. A number of the album's tracks remain staples of the reunited Camper Van Beethoven's live sets, including "Good Guys and Bad Guys", "The History of Utah", "Interstellar Overdrive" and "Shut Us Down".



Camper Van Beethoven - Camper Van Beethoven  (flac 347mb)

01 Good Guys & Bad Guys 3:55
02 Joe Stalin's Cadillac 2:32
03 Five Sticks 1:37
04 Lulu Land 2:55
05 Une Fois 1:28
06 We Saw Jerry's Daughter 2:09
07 Surprise Truck 3:27
08 Stairway To Heaven (Sic) 2:32
09 Pope Festival 2:46
10 Love The Witch (Camper Van Beethoven Version) 2:41
11 Pictures Of Matchstick Men (Fox Demo) 4:26
12 The History Of Utah 2:52
13 Still Wishing To Course 3:50
14 We Love You 2:03
15 Deux Foises 1:25
16 Hoe Yourself Down 2:14
17 Peace & Love 2:39
18 Folly 1:57
19 Interstellar Overdrive 7:45
20 Shut Us Down 1:26

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May 27, 2014

RhoDeo 1421 Roots

Hello,

it's about Nigerian's funky 70s past, the music will astonish you ...N'joy

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Nigeria, officially the Federal Republic of Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic comprising 36 states and its Federal Capital Territory, Abuja. The country is located in West Africa and shares land borders with the Republic of Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea on the Atlantic Ocean. Long the site of numerous kingdoms and empires, the modern state of Nigeria has its origins in the British colonization of the region during the late nineteenth to early twentieth centuries, emerging from the combination of two neighboring British protectorates: (the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate). The British set up administrative and legal structures while retaining traditional chiefdoms. Nigeria became independent in 1960, but plunged into civil war several years later. It has since alternated between democratically-elected civilian governments and military dictatorships, with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be conducted reasonably free and fair.

Nigeria is often referred to as the "the Giant of Africa", due to its large population and economy. With around 174 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa. The country is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest comprising 60%. are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba. Nigeria is roughly divided in half between Christians, who mostly live in the Southern and central parts of the country, and Muslims, concentrated mostly in the North and South-West. Its economy (GDP) in 2014 became the largest in Africa; worth more than $500 billion, and overtaking South Africa while becoming the world's 26th largest economy.

The people traded overland with traders from North Africa for centuries. In the 16th century, Spanish and Portuguese explorers were the first Europeans to begin trade in Nigeria, in the port they named Lagos and in Calabar. The Europeans traded goods with the peoples of the coast. Soon they also negotiated for a portion of the existing African slave trade. When the Europeans entered the trade, they transported slaves mostly to the Americas to work as labourers. There, slavery became a racial caste to which people of African descent were confined, particularly in what became the United States. According to the Encyclopedia of African History, "It is estimated that by the 1890s the largest slave population of the world, about 2 million people, was concentrated in the territories of the Islamic Sokoto Caliphate. The use of slave labor was extensive, especially in agriculture.

The independent kingdoms of what later became Nigeria fought many wars against the British Empire in the late 19th and early 20th centuries trying to regain independence. By war, the British conquered Benin in 1897, and in the Anglo-Aro War from 1901—1902 defeated other opponents. The restraint or complete destruction of these states opened up the Niger area to British rule. In 1914, the British formally united the Niger area as the Colony and Protectorate of Nigeria. Administratively, Nigeria remained divided into the northern and southern provinces and Lagos Colony. The people of the South, with more interaction with the British and other Europeans due to the coastal economy, adopted Western education and developed a modern economy more rapidly than in the north. Many of its elite's sons went to Great Britain for education. The regional differences continue to be expressed in Nigeria's political life as well.

On 1 October 1960, Nigeria gained its independence from the United Kingdom. Nigeria's government was a coalition of conservative parties: the Nigerian People's Congress (NPC), a party dominated by Northerners and those of the Islamic faith; and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC) led by Nnamdi Azikiwe, who became Nigeria's maiden Governor-General in 1960. The cultural and political differences among Nigeria's dominant ethnic groups: the Hausa ('Northerners'), Igbo ('Easterners') and Yoruba ('Westerners'), were sharp.The Northern coup, motivated by ethnic and religious reasons, resulted in the deaths of many military officers and civilians, especially those of Igbo descent. The violence against the Igbo increased their desire for autonomy. By May 1967, the Eastern Region voted to declare independence as a state called the Republic of Biafra, under the leadership of Lt Colonel Emeka Ojukwu. The Nigerian Civil War began as the Nigerian (Western and Northern) side attacked Biafra (South-eastern) on 6 July 1967 at Garkem. The 30 month war, with a long siege of Biafra and its isolation from trade and supplies, ended in January 1970. Estimates of the number of dead in the former Eastern Region are between 1 and 3 million people, from warfare, disease, and starvation, during the 30-month civil war. Britain and the Soviet Union were the main military backers of the Nigerian government while France and others helped the Biafrans.

During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined OPEC, and the huge revenue generated made the economy richer, although the military administration did nothing to improve the standard of living of the population, or to help the small and medium businesses, or even invest in the infrastructure. As oil revenues fuelled the rise of federal subventions to states, the federal government became the centre of political struggle and the threshold of power in the country. As oil production and revenue rose, the Nigerian government created a dangerous situation as it became increasingly dependent on oil revenues and the international commodity markets for budgetary and economic concerns; it did not build economic stability. That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

Nigeria regained democracy in 1999 when it elected Olusegun Obasanjo, the former military head of state, as the new President of Nigeria ending almost 33 years of military rule (from 1966 until 1999). Ethnic violence over the oil producing Niger Delta region and inadequate infrastructures are some of the issues in the country. Umaru Yar'Adua of the People's Democratic Party (PDP) came into power in the general election of 2007 – an election that was witnessed and condemned by the international community as being severely flawed. Yar'Adua died on 5 May 2010. Dr. Goodluck Jonathan was sworn in as Yar'Adua's replacement on 6 May 2010. Goodluck Jonathan of the PDP was declared the winner on 19 April 2011, having won the election by a total of 22,495,187 of the 39,469,484 votes cast. He seems the laissez faire type, unfortunately the insanely violent Boko Haran terrorists will demand serious attenton...

Next week more about Nigeria

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Today's albums are a rarety of sorts because the label that released them, sort of rertracted them and released single cd samplers with colourful subtitles such as Nigeria 70 - Lagos Jump (Original Heavyweight Afrobeat Highlife & Afro-Funk), Nigeria 70 - Sweet Times (Afro-Funk, High Life and JuJu from 1970's Lagos) and the double Nigeria 70 The Definitive Story Of Funky Lagos. The double albums here are thus quiet unique as plenty of what's on offer here isn't made available with the albums mentoned above.

Given what most Westerners know about Nigeria's history, the title of this collection may seem odd, but in fact, it represents the beginning of a brief decade when things were finally shifting in the nation's favor. This was the beginning of the true post-colonial period for Nigeria, the Biafran war had come to an end, there was an oil boom offering disposable income to a larger portion of the population, and musicians were benefiting from an increase in the number of clubs to play in and the interest of both local and international major labels taking root on their soil. Add to this the innovations brought about by musicians themselves, many of whom who had traveled internationally. Strut has assembled a solid 13 tracks that signify the musical fruits of this period on Nigeria 70  The music ranges from the sprightly, rocking highlife to the proto-Igbo highlife funk and the futuristic juju. The sheer variety of styles, dialects, and musical
ambition is startling. This set is irresistible; unlike many other comps out there, its sound is as good as it gets, necessary volumes for any fan of African groove music from the 1970s in general and Nigeria in particular.

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Various -  Nigeria 70 Vol.1-1  (flac  408mb)

01 Koola Lobitos - Ololufe Mi 5:15
02 Monomono - Tire Loma Da Nigbehin 4:46
03 Blo - Chant To Mother Earth 6:04
04 Fela Anikulapo Kuti & Africa 70 - Jeun Ko Ku (Chop 'N' Quench) 7:15
05 Tunji Oyelana & The Benders - Ifa 5:11
06 Bala Miller & The Great Music Pyrameeds Of Afrika - Ikon Allah 5:44
07 Segun Bucknor & His Revolution - La La La 3:33
08 Peter King - Shango 5:49
09 Tony Allen & His Afro Messengers - No Discrimination 7:30
10 Sir Victor Uwaifo & His Melody Maestroes - Akayan Ekassa 3:11
11 William Onyeabor - Better Change Your Mind 8:13
12 Bongos Ikwue - Woman Made The Devil 4:06
13 Eric Showboat Akaeze - We Dey Find Money 10:08

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Various -  Nigeria 70 Vol.1-2  (flac  458mb)

14 Orlando Julius & His Afro Sounders - Alo Mi Alo (Parts 1 & 2 ) 8:02
15 Sir Shina Peters - Yabis 6:58
16 Afro Cult Foundation - The Quest 7:11
17 Joni Haastrup - Greetings 6:12
18 Gasper Lawal - Kita Kita 6:05
19 Fela Anikulapo Kuti & Africa 70 - Upside Down 14:43
20 Chief Checker - Africa Ire 5:42
21 King Sunny Ade & His African Beats - Ja Fun Mi (Instrumental) 7:16
22 The Faces - Tug Of War 4:19
23 Orlando Julius - Afro Blues 6:14
24 The Black Santiagos - Ole 3:15
25 Madman Jaga - Hankuri 3:01

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Various -  Nigeria 70 Vol.2-1  (flac  465mb)

01 Sahara All Stars - Take Your Soul 7:09
02 Sahara All Stars - Alikali Adajo 8L58
03 Don Isaac Ezekiel Combination - Ire 3:20
04 Dr Victor Olaiya's International All-Stars - Kinringjingbin 4:28
05 Fela Kuti - Go Slow 11:59
06 Tunji Oyelana - Ipasan 5:20
07 Etubom Rex Williams - Isip 3:31
08 Orlando Julius - Mura Sise 7:00
09 The Anansa Profesionals -  Enwan 5:31
10 The Don Isaac Ezekiel Combination - The Lords Prayer 3:13
11 Agboho feat Easy Kabaka Brown - Obotopo 8:53
12 Tunji Oyelana - Iwo Ko La Dami 5:49
13 The Nkengas - Anyi Bundi Igbo 3:08

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Various -  Nigeria 70 Vol.2-2  (flac 474mb)

14 Uppers International - Dankasa 3:36
15 Bola Johnson & His Easy Life Top Beats - Lagos Sisi 3:23
16 K. Frimpong - Me Yee Owu Den 8:54
17 Fela Kuti - Africa Centre Of The World 14:22
18 African Brothers Band - Ngyegye No So 3:22
19 Jay-U Experience - Some More 6:03
20 Tunde Mabadu - Viva Disco 5:40
21 S-Job Movement - Love Affair 6:48
22 Dr. Victor Olaiya's All Stars - Omeleble 5:53
23 De Frank Professionals - Afe Ato Yen Bio 4:43
24 Commander In Chief Osita Osadet - Onyebu Chi 3:34
25 Fidel Sax Bateke - Motako 4:52
26 Fuburu Sekibo - Psychedelic Baby 3:10
27 Mixed Grill - A Brand New Wayo 5:01

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May 26, 2014

RhoDeo 1421 Cabin P 7

Hello, Euro elections results today and unsurprisingly media darling UKIP won in a country that really hates minority opinions, they were forced to use proportional representation, but the clever bullies had an answer to having too many voices (-like Germany 8 different parties get represented in the EU parliament) we cut up the UK in regions and as then there's just a handful of seats available minor parties will never get a voice-thus no greens or liberals. The UK pride themselves as the inventors of modern democracy but i'm afraid it's a terribly cynical form of democracy, one that reflects the bully nature of it's society. BTW despite voting on thursday they're still not ready counting in London at this moment 2AM GMT, backward and or cynical ..

Anyway the conservatives gamble that they can armwrestle Brussels out of some rights, but they are seriously mistaken in fact more and more Europe is fed up with the me me me screaming Brits. "Goodbye and go and play with the remnants of your empire, oh yes and we'll love squeezing the oxygen out of your City empire. Frack away your countryside and sieg heil to your new pub leader Nigel Farage..."

Meanwhile over in Monaco bully boy Hamilton didn't get his way and was even forced to defend his 2nd place from Riccardo, who missed the start somewhat but made the most of it, as his partner Vettel once again got frustrated by his car, this time dropping out from third after 4 laps. I wonder what is going on at Red Bull all the mishaps with the car seems to befall on Vettel...curious. Oh well Germans have to make do with the euro-german Rosberg and his superior Mercedes, btw i'f like to have that new Porsche 918 for my birthday, supercar with less co2 emission than a Prius, am even prepared to move to Germany too really make use of it's speed, alas lacking a million dollar...

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Cabin Pressure is a radio situation comedy series written by John Finnemore. Its first series was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2008. The show follows the exploits of the oddball crew of the single aeroplane owned by "MJN Air" as they are chartered to take all manner of items, people or animals across the world. The show stars Stephanie Cole, Roger Allam, Benedict Cumberbatch and John Finnemore.

The principal cast, the 4-person crew, is the following:

As part of her last divorce settlement, Carolyn Knapp-Shappey (Stephanie Cole) received a mid-size (16 seat) jet aeroplane named "GERTI" (a "Lockheed McDonnell 312", registration G-ERTI). As a result, she founds her very own single plane charter airline, "MJN Air" ("My Jet Now"), which is crewed by an oddball mixture of characters who fly to various cities around the world, encountering a variety of situations.

The airline's only Captain, Martin Crieff (Benedict Cumberbatch), has wanted to be a pilot since he was six years old (before which he wanted to be an aeroplane). He suffers, however, from a distinct lack of natural ability in that department. He was rejected by at least one flight school, and had to put himself through the required coursework, barely qualifying for his certification – on his seventh attempt. He took the job with MJN for no salary at all, as long as he could be Captain. He appears to have no outside interests beyond flying. He is a stickler for procedures and regulations, but is more prissy than pompous. At the end of series two he tells Douglas that he survives financially by running a delivery service using the van he inherited from his father (running two different jobs largely explaining the lack of hobbies). This was his only inheritance (apart from a tool kit and multimeter) because his father believed he would waste any money he received trying to become a pilot. He has two siblings, Caitlin, now a traffic warden and Simon, a council administrator who often frustrates Martin with his annoying superiority. This isn't helped by his Mother's constant admiration of Simon, often saying that "Simon knows best".

First Officer Douglas Richardson (Roger Allam) is, on the other hand, a quite competent pilot who worked for Air England – until he was fired for smuggling. He chafes at his subordinate position to Martin, and misses no opportunity to flaunt his superiority in the younger pilot's face. In later episodes, it is revealed that Douglas, ashamed of his second-rate job, dresses in Captain's uniform for his wife Helena's benefit, changing to First Officer's uniform before he gets to work. Douglas is, however, something of a smooth operator who knows all of the dodges available to airline officers, and enjoys taking part in all of them.

Carolyn's son Arthur Shappey (John Finnemore) is an eager and cheery dimwit aged 29, who is supposed to be the flight attendant but usually manages to get in everyone's way. He is half-English and half-Australian; Carolyn is his English mother, and Gordon, Carolyn's ex-husband, his Australian father (original owner of Gertie). Arthur is a relentless optimist, whose biggest claim to fame is being the inventor (or at least discoverer) of fizzy yoghurt (the recipe for which is yoghurt plus time). He also celebrates Birling day, Birling day eve, Gertie's birthday and Summer Christmas, and is a definite polar bear enthusiast and expert. He is very allergic to dragon fruit and strawberries, but frequently forgets, having eaten strawberry mousse on occasion.

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Cabin Pressure - 201  Helsinki (ogg 25mb)

201  Helsinki 28:02

Carolyn and her sister haven't spoken for fifteen years so when Arthur books a fake trip to Helsinki with Carolyn's sister, her husband and her grandson, it is a little awkward. Kieran intimidates Martin and shows some exceptional karate skills, Arthur makes an imaginative cake and Douglas exchanges orchids for fishcakes.

previously

Cabin Pressure - 101 Abu Dhabi (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 102  Boston (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 103  Cremona (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 104  Douz (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 105  Edinburgh (ogg 25mb)
Cabin Pressure - 106  Fitton (ogg 25mb)

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May 25, 2014

Sundaze 1421

Hello, yes the pretty boys from Real won the cup, undeservedly i might add not just during the game where they managed to equalize in the third minute of extra time with the first real effort on goal. On a side note i found the amount of extra time suspicious. The Athletico men had been spent, the extra time saw that illegal hit man Bale head the winner into the net as he was quick to direct a deflected shot into the top corner. Illegal yes that 100 million euro's man shouldn't have been allowed to be bought by a technically bankrupt club. Athletico has seen it's best players bought away these last years on that account they have a healthy balance. But don't expect those at the UEFA proclaiming fair play to do anything about it....

The coming month it's all about elektrolux's space nights. Space Night (full title: space night - All-tag nachts) is the name of a German television program in the early night/morning hours each day. It is a mixture of chill-out-music and images of the earth as seen from space interspersed with informative broadcasts. It was started by the Bayerischer Rundfunk (BR) in 1994 and is now broadcast by BR-alpha, .....N'Joy

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Space Night started in 1994 as a replacement of the test cards which were broadcast on BR at night until this time. The idea originated in the fact that the German satellite ASTRO-SPAS (see STS-80) had recorded many hours of video footage in space. The BR received this footage, edited the material and added downtempo spherical music.

As BR did not want to show the same pictures 7 days a week, both NASA and ESA as well as the German Aerospace Center were addressed. They offered more hours of footage from in and around space, which were thusly included.
Cult status and music.

Space Night IX





The broadcast quickly turned into a cult: At raves in the mid-90s it wasn't unusual to show the images of Space Night on big TV-screens. Early in the morning after the rave it was often used to calm down, especially from 1996 and later, as Space Night's sound changed through the musical guidance by Alex Azary (a European chill-out-DJ), who provided a more electronic background music. This was a logical step that originated from Alex Azary. He headed the Club XS in Frankfurt where "chill out nights" started in 1990, supported by spherical music. Alongside, pictures of Space Night were shown, albeit the playback was a little bit slower than in the original program. The images did fit well to the then new music-genre and Alex thought it would be a good idea to show it to the people at BR. A meeting in Munich followed where he could convince them to try something new.

The compositions are also available as separate CDs, the mixdown starting from the album "Space Night II" is done by the German music label Elektrolux. In the meantime, twelve CD-albums with music to the television series have been published, with three of those clearly differing in musical style. While "Space Night Vol. 1" is an album featuring pop music, "Space Night Vol. 10" features Jazz music and "Space Night Vol. 12" is a double CD with classical music. A DVD titled "Best of Earth-Views" is also available.

After a change in tariffs by the GEMA, BR stated they would not want to continue Space Night starting in January 2013, due to the drastically increased royalties. Hence the series was ended on January 8th 2013. Numerous viewers engaged BR to continue Space Night by using GEMA-free music. The station decided to undo the cancellation, first by rerunning older episodes starting on February 25th, 2013 and to later broadcast new episodes starting in autumn of 2013. To accomplish this, BR will use music with Creative Commons licensing, encouraging their viewer to upload their favorites.

The restart was scheduled for November 1st, 2013. It had to be postponed to November, 15th, because NASA was not able to provide the necessary graphical material, due to the Government shutdown in the United States

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The nights of the Bavarian television with their shots from space or its simulation as well as the lounge wants to played / fall asleep electronic music for many years of the classics, if you enjoy the evening slowly or watching TV. For both, the music is ideal. Which does not mean that they would be shallow, arbitrary or boring. The opposite is the successful compilations on this shipment usually the case. So also with output IX. Elegant Chill out music from some of the usual suspects (Pascal FEOS, Aural Float, Funky Porcini, Waldeck, Roysköpp or Lemongrass) and hopeful Neutönern (Jean F. Cochois, Avatars Of Dub, Metalob, Ruxpin). The Space Night series has become an indestructible reputation that reaches as readily to the Cafe del Mar series. And just like there are for some time and over again to find a few boring tracks. Therefore, no Höchstlob, wonderful she is but has certainly turned.



VA - Space Night Vol. 09 alpha  (flac 479mb)

01 Guardner - N.Y.C. 5:26
02 Josh One - Contemplation (Fresh Moods Remix) 6:01
03 Avatars Of Dub - Sexelevatormuzik (Thievery Corporation Mix) 5:15
04 The Funky Lowlives - Inside (Dorfmeister vs. Uptight Mix) 4:28
05 Sniper Mode & MBP - Diesel 3:45
06 Pascal F.E.O.S. - Down To Earth 6:35
07 Mono Chrome - Flowers In Ocean (Edit) 5:24
08 Lemongrass - Feel Good 6:13
09 Jens Buchert - Spirit Of A Dream 5:20
10 Naoki Kenji - Night Passage 4:20
11 Fresh Moods - The Touch 8:18
12 Jean F. Cochois - From The Edge Of Time 5:40
13 Fous De La Mer - Stars & Fishes 5:22
14 Röyksopp - In Space 3:28

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VA - Space Night Vol. 9 Beta  (flac 448mb)

01 Waldeck - Dub Ploitation (First Impression Dub) 6:07
02 PFL - Airwalk 4:51
03 Aural Float - Perspectives (Life In Dub Remix) 5:20
04 Funki Porcini - It's A Long Road 3:39
05 Chris Coco - Only Dub 4:13
06 Black Dog & Black Sifichi - Invisible Things 4:13
07 Robert Leiner - Roots FM1 6:54
08 The Sushi Club - Hamaguri 8:12
09 Metalob - Airwave 7:17
10 Ruxpin - In Form Of A Bird I Meet My Creator 6:23
11 Copshow - Side Walk 2:37
12 üNN - Pictures 4:50
13 Chris Zippel - Surface (Genuine Remix) 5:53
14 The Orb - Dilmun 3:58

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I don't know if Elektrolux was muscled out of the commercial successful space night series or not, fact is Sony picked it up but forgot to bring the Aural Floaters on board and as is all to common with these big labels they didn't know what to do with it. The predecessor Space night 10 was a jazz act doing their thing, a single album that really didn't fit the series. So expectations were there for the new double album Spacenight 11 Unfortunately, this edition now doesn't deliver. I associate or association with Space Night not only innovative (!) chill-out and ambient music it appealed to a very conscious niche in the vast lo-fi and electric field. The titles were to listen to the early Space Night samplers were not together stolen from various other compilations, but were usually so pre-release of the silent high quality Elektrolux labels from Frankfurt. Now the forefathers of Aural Float from the project have withdrawn and therefore the fascinating and compelling series comes to an end. "Stop when it's at its most beautiful!" has been heeded.
Unfortunately, Sony did the opposite and with this bland compilation (really sad considering it 'celebrated' the 10th anniversary of the series) alienated the loyal fans. A great pity!



VA - Space Night Vol.11 Alpha (flac  462mb)

01 I Monster - Daydream In Blue 3:37
02 Nightmares On Wax - Les Nuits 6:17
03 Hooverphonic - Mad About You (Llorca's Radio Shot) 4:24
04 Vargo - Get Back To Serenity (Beach Mix) 6:08
05 Zoo Brazil - 1987 4:58
06 Solasoap - Look Around (Album Version) 4:54
07 The Strike Boys - Cocaine Is A Sin 6:33
08 Vienna DC - DC Lounge Theme (Album Version) 4:42
09 Aquanote - Nowhere 7:08
10 Booka Shade - Moonstruck 6:10
11 Audioplacid - Diving (Adam's Clear Mix) 3:57
12 Benet - Trap 6:35
13 Terranova - Common Places (Album Version) 4:72
14 Micatone - A Part Of Me (Album Version) 4:10
15 Roger Sanchez - Another Chance (Afterlife Mix) 5:30

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VA - Space Night Vol. 11 Beta (flac 466mb)

01 Justus Köhncke - Timecode 7:45
02 Gaelle - Rain 6:39
03 Chevallier - Crack City (Club Chevallier Mix) 5:30
04 Freaks - Where Were You When The Lights Went Out 6:33
05 M.A.N.D.Y. - Tonite 6:58
06 Korsakow - I Don't Know 4:34
07 Seelenluft - You Come Along (Joakim Remix) 6:35
08 Unit 4 - Bodydub 4:03
09 Scissor Sisters - Comfortably Numb (Album Version) 4:26
10 Chelonis R. Jones - One & One 7:02
11 Moonbootica - Love Is Our Gold 5:55
12 Jimi Tenor - Take Me Baby (Album Version) 3:39
13 Planet Funk - The Switch (Radio Edit) 3:14
14 Tiga - Pleasure From The Bass (12inch Version-Edit) 5:20

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May 24, 2014

RhoDeo 1420 Grooves

Hello, leaving the Beats be for now and swiching over to another style of beats, one that preceded our digital age,  the groove...".

The groove as "an intuitive sense of style as process, a perception of a cycle in motion, a form or organizing pattern being revealed, a recurrent clustering of elements through time." Aigen states that "when groove is established among players, the musical whole becomes greater than the sum of its parts, enabling a person […] to experience something beyond himself which he/she cannot create alone . When the musical slang phrase "Being in the groove" is applied to a group of improvisers, this has been called "an advanced level of development for any improvisational music group" which "forces of unseen connection that directly influence our experience and behaviour. Peter Forrester and John Bailey argue that the "chances of achieving this higher level of playing" (i.e., attain a "groove") is improved when the musicians are "open to other's musical ideas", "complemen[t] other participant’s  musical ideas", and "taking risks with the music. Yes scientists have discovered the groove, they probably aren't allowed to use mind expanding stimulants to further grasp as to what is going on . I'll tell you one thing...you can't digitize it ! It's in your hips....


The coming weeks it's all about "Soul Brother Number One," "the Godfather of Soul," "the Hardest Working Man in Show Business," "Mr. Dynamite" -- those are mighty titles, but no one can question that today's artist earned them more than any other performer. Other singers were more popular, others were equally skilled, but few other African-American musicians were so influential over the course of popular music. And no other musician, pop or otherwise, put on a more exciting, exhilarating stage show: his performances were marvels of athletic stamina and split-second timing. He is ranked seventh on the music magazine Rolling Stone's list of its 100 greatest artists of all time......N'joy

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Through the gospel-impassioned fury of his vocals and the complex polyrhythms of his beats, Brown was a crucial midwife in not just one, but two revolutions in black American music. He was one of the figures most responsible for turning R&B into soul and he was, most would agree, the figure most responsible for turning soul music into the funk of the late '60s and early '70s. After the mid-'70s, he did little more than tread water artistically; his financial and drug problems eventually got him a controversial prison sentence. Yet in a sense, his music is now more influential than ever, as his voice and rhythms have been sampled on innumerable hip-hop recordings, and critics have belatedly hailed his innovations as among the most important in all of rock or soul.

Brown's rags-to-riches-to-rags story has heroic and tragic dimensions of mythic resonance. Born into poverty in the South, he ran afoul of the law by the late '40s on an armed robbery conviction. With the help of singer Bobby Byrd's family, Brown gained parole and started a gospel group with Byrd, changing their focus to R&B as the rock revolution gained steam. The Flames, as the Georgian group was known in the mid-'50s, signed to Federal/King and had a huge R&B hit right off the bat with the wrenching, churchy ballad "Please, Please, Please." By that point, The Flames had become James Brown & the Famous Flames; the charisma, energy, and talent of Brown made him the natural star attraction.

 All of Brown's singles over the next two years flopped, as he sought to establish his own style, recording material that was obviously derivative of heroes like Roy Brown, Hank Ballard, Little Richard, and Ray Charles. In retrospect, it can be seen that Brown was in the same position as dozens of other R&B one-shot: talented singers in need of better songs, or not fully on the road to a truly original sound. What made Brown succeed where hundreds of others failed was his superhuman determination, working the chitlin circuit to death, sharpening his band, and keeping an eye on new trends. He was on the verge of being dropped from King in late 1958 when his perseverance finally paid off, as "Try Me" became a number one R&B (and small pop) hit, and several follow-ups established him as a regular visitor to the R&B charts.

Brown's style of R&B got harder as the '60s began; he added more complex, Latin- and jazz-influenced rhythms on hits like "Good Good Lovin'," "I'll Go Crazy," "Think," and "Night Train," alternating these with torturous ballads that featured some of the most frayed screaming to be heard outside of the church. Black audiences already knew that Brown had the most exciting live act around, but he truly started to become a phenomenon with the release of Live at the Apollo in 1963. Capturing a James Brown concert in all its whirling-dervish energy and calculated spontaneity, the album reached number two on the album charts, an unprecedented feat for a hardcore R&B LP.

Live at the Apollo was recorded and released against the wishes of the King label. It was this kind of artistic standoff that led Brown to seek better opportunities elsewhere. In 1964, he ignored his King contract to record "Out of Sight" for Smash, igniting a lengthy legal battle that prevented him from issuing vocal recordings for about a year. When he finally resumed recording for King in 1965, he had a new contract that granted him far more artistic control over his releases.

Brown's new era had truly begun, however, with "Out of Sight," which topped the R&B charts and made the pop Top 40. For some time, Brown had been moving toward more elemental lyrics that threw in as many chants and screams as they did words, and more intricate beats and horn charts that took some of their cues from the ensemble work of jazz outfits. "Out of Sight" wasn't called funk when it came out, but it had most of the essential ingredients. These were amplified and perfected on 1965's "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag," a monster that finally broke Brown to the white audience, reaching the Top Ten. The even more adventurous follow-up, "I Got You (I Feel Good)," did even better, making number three.

 These hits kicked off Brown's period of greatest commercial success and public visibility. From 1965 to the end of the decade, he was rarely off the R&B charts, often on the pop listings, and all over the concert circuit and national television, even meeting with Vice President Hubert Humphrey and other important politicians as a representative of the black community. His music became even bolder and funkier, as melody was dispensed with almost altogether in favor of chunky rhythms and magnetic interplay between his vocals, horns, drums, and scratching electric guitar (heard to best advantage on hits like "Cold Sweat," "I Got the Feelin'," and "There Was a Time"). The lyrics were not so much words as chanted, stream-of-consciousness slogans, often aligning themselves with black pride as well as good old-fashioned (or new-fashioned) sex. Much of the credit for the sound he devised belonged to (and has now been belatedly attributed to) his top-notch supporting musicians such as saxophonists Maceo Parker, St. Clair Pinckney, and Pee Wee Ellis; guitarist Jimmy Nolen; backup singer and longtime loyal associate Bobby Byrd; and drummer Clyde Stubblefield.

Brown was both a brilliant bandleader and a stern taskmaster, the latter leading his band to walk out on him in late 1969. Amazingly, he turned the crisis to his advantage by recruiting a young Cincinnati outfit called the Pacemakers featuring guitarist Catfish Collins and bassist Bootsy Collins. Although they only stayed with him for about a year, they were crucial to Brown's evolution into even harder funk, emphasizing the rhythm and the bottom even more. The Collins brothers, for their part, put their apprenticeship to good use, helping define '70s funk as members of the Parliament-Funkadelic axis.

 In the early '70s, many of the most important members of Brown's late-'60s band returned to the fold, to be billed as the J.B.'s (they also made records on their own). Brown continued to score heavily on the R&B charts throughout the first half of the '70s, the music becoming more and more elemental and beat-driven. At the same time, he was retreating from the white audience he had cultivated during the mid- to late '60s; records like "Make It Funky," "Hot Pants," "Get on the Good Foot," and "The Payback" were huge soul sellers, but only modest pop ones. Critics charged, with some justification, that the Godfather was starting to repeat and recycle himself too many times. It must be remembered, though, that these songs were made for the singles radio jukebox market and not meant to be played one after the other on CD compilations (as they are today).

By the mid-'70s, Brown was beginning to burn out artistically. He seemed shorn of new ideas, was being out-gunned on the charts by disco, and was running into problems with the IRS and his financial empire. There were sporadic hits, and he could always count on enthusiastic live audiences, but by the '80s, he didn't have a label. With the explosion of rap, however, which frequently sampled vintage J.B.'s records, Brown became hipper than ever. He collaborated with Afrika Bambaataa on the critical smash single "Unity" and reentered the Top Ten in 1986 with "Living in America." Rock critics, who had always ranked Brown considerably below Otis Redding and Aretha Franklin in the soul canon, began to reevaluate his output, particularly the material from his funk years, sometimes anointing him not just "Soul Brother Number One," but the most important black musician of the rock era.

 In 1988, Brown's personal life came crashing down in a well-publicized incident in which he was accused by his wife of assault and battery. After a year skirting hazy legal and personal troubles, he led the police on an interstate car chase after allegedly threatening people with a handgun. The episode ended in a six-year prison sentence that many felt was excessive; he was paroled after serving two years.

Throughout the '90s Brown continued to perform and release new material like Love Over-Due (1991), Universal James (1992), and I'm Back (1998). While none of these recordings could be considered as important as his earlier work and did little to increase his popularity, his classic catalog became more popular in the American mainstream during this time than it had been since the '70s, and not just among young rappers and samplers. One of the main reasons for this was a proper presentation of his recorded legacy. For a long time, his cumbersome, byzantine discography was mostly out of print, with pieces available only on skimpy greatest-hits collections. A series of exceptionally well-packaged reissues on PolyGram changed that situation; the Star Time box set is the best overview, with other superb compilations devoted to specific phases of his lengthy career, from '50s R&B to '70s funk.

 In 2004, Brown was diagnosed with prostate cancer but successfully fought the disease. By 2006, it was in remission and Brown, then 73, began a global tour dubbed the Seven Decades of Funk World Tour. Late in the year while at a routine dentist appointment, the singer was diagnosed with pneumonia. He was admitted to the hospital for treatment but died of heart failure a few days later, in the early morning hours of Christmas Day. A public viewing was held at Apollo Theater in Harlem, followed by a private ceremony in his hometown of Augusta, GA.

No idea which label had this page blocked, i can only hope it will safe them from financial ruin, meanwhile it's doubtful James Browns heirs will get any of it...not that i think they are entitled to any money James's creative juices brought forth but hey that's a wholly different discussion
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An astonishing record of James and the Flames tearing the roof off the sucker at the mecca of R&B theatres, New York's Apollo. When King Records owner Syd Nathan refused to fund the recording, thinking it commercial folly, Brown single-mindedly proceeded anyway, paying for it out of his own pocket. He had been out on the road night after night for a while, and he knew that the magic that was part and parcel of a James Brown show was something no record had ever caught. Hit follows hit without a pause -- "I'll Go Crazy," "Try Me," "Think," "Please Please Please," "I Don't Mind," "Night Train," and more. The affirmative screams and cries of the audience are something you've never experienced unless you've seen the Brown Revue in a Black theater. If you have, I need not say more; if you haven't, suffice to say that this should be one of the very first records you ever own.




01 Introduction To James Brown 1:48
02 I'll Go Crazy 2:05
03 Try Me 2:26
04 Think 1:58
05 I Don't Mind 2:39
06 Lost Someone 10:43
07 Medley: Please, Please, Please / You've Got The Power / I Found Someone / Why Do You Do Me / I Want You So Bad / I Love You, Yes I Do / Strange Things Happen / Bewildered / Please, Please, Please 6:26
08 Night Train 3:28
09 Think 2:00
10 Medley: I Found Someone / Why Do You Do Me / I Want You So Bad 2:09
11 Lost Someone 2:41
12 I'll Go Crazy 2:18


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By 1962, Brown scored a hit with his band with their cover of the instrumental, "Night Train", becoming not only a top five R&B single but also Brown's first top 40 entry on the Billboard Hot 100. Brown scored his first top 20 pop hit with his rendition of the standard, "Prisoner of Love". He also launched his first label, Try Me Records, which included recordings by the likes of Tammy Montgomery, Johnny & Bill and the Poets, which was another name used for Brown's backing band. In 1964, seeking bigger commercial success, Brown and Bobby Byrd formed the production company, Fair Deal, linking the operation to the Mercury imprint, Smash Records. King Records, however, fought against this and was granted an injunction preventing Brown from releasing any recordings for the label. Prior to the injunction, Brown had released three vocal singles, including the blues-oriented hit, "Out of Sight", which further indicated the direction his music was going to take. With a new deal with King, Brown released his composition, "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag", which became his first top ten pop hit and won Brown his first Grammy Award. Later in 1965, Brown issued "I Got You", which became his second single in a row to reach number-one on the R&B chart and top ten on the pop chart. Brown followed that up with the ballad, "It's a Man's Man's Man's World" which confirmed his stance as a top-ranking performer, especially with R&B audiences from that point on. This here then is a record of those days...




01 Night Train
02 Shout And Shimmy LIVE
03 Like A Baby
04 I've Got Money
05 Prisoner Of Love
06 These Foolish Things LIVE
07 (Can You) Feel It - Part 1
08 Lost Someone
09 Signed, Sealed, And Delivered
10 Waiting In Vain
11 In The Wee Wee Hours (Of The Nite)
12 Oh Baby Don't You Weep LIVE
13 Again
14 How Long Darling
15 So Long
16 The Things That I Used To Do
17 Out Of Sight
18 Maybe The Last Time
19 Have Mercy Baby
20 I Got You (I Feel Good)
21 Papa's Got A Brand New Bag - Part 1
22 Ain't That A Groove - Part 1
23 It's A Man's Man's Man's World
24 Money Won't Change You


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There are several worthy James Brown compilations. But this is the one, more than any other, that presents his most fertile and innovative soul and funk material. From 1964's "Out of Sight" through 1969's "Mother Popcorn," this was Brown at the apex of his creativity, turning soul into funk in the mid-'60s, then pushing the rhythm even more to the forefront. Most of his hit singles from this five-year explosion of white heat are on this 27-track, two-CD set, including "Out of Sight," "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag," "I Got You (I Feel Good)," "Say It Loud--I'm Black and I'm Proud," and "Cold Sweat." There are some minor omissions that could be questioned (the absence of the studio version of "Bring It Up," for instance), and big James Brown fans will already have the lion's share of tracks, on the Star Time box and other releases. It does, however, contain minor but significant bonuses: an alternate take of "Cold Sweat," a previously unreleased live medley of "Out of Sight" and "Bring It Up," and a previously unreleased live version of "Licking Stick--Licking Stick." There are also longer versions of "I Don't Want Nobody to Give Me Nothing" (ten minutes!), "I Got the Feelin'," "The Popcorn," and "Brother Rapp" that were edited when they were prepared for official release.




 (A Brand New Bag 1964 - 1969)

01 Out Of Sight 2:22
02 Papa's Got A Brand New Bag Pt. 1 & 2 4:16
03 I Got You (I Feel Good) 2:45
04 Money Won't Change You Pt. 1 & 24:15
05 Introduction / Out Of Sight/Bring It Up (Live) 5:54
06 Let Yourself Go 3:57
07 There Was A Time 4:25
08 Cold Sweat Pt. 1 & 2 7:23
09 Get It Together Pt. 1 & 28:57
10 Goodbye My Love Pt. 1 & 2 5:36
11 I Can't Stand Myself (When You Touch Me) Pt. 1 & 2 7:19
12 I Got The Feelin' 3:05
13 The Popcorn 4:30
14 Cold Sweat (False Start) 0:23
15 Cold Sweat (Alternate Take) 6:50


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01 Licking Stick-Licking Stick (Live) 4:15
02 Say It Loud I'm Black And I'm Proud Pt. 1 & 2 4:50
03 Give It Up Or Turnit Loose 4:30
04 You Got To Have A Mother For Me 5:39
05 I Don't Want Nobody To Give Me Nothing (Open Up The Door I'll Get It Myself) 9:43
06 Let A Man Come In And Do The Popcorn Pt. 1 & 2 7:47
07 It's A New Day Pt. 1 & 2 6:25
08 Ain't It Funky Now 9:28
09 Brother Rapp 7:00
10 Funky Drummer Pt. 1 & 2 5:34
11 She's The One 2:59
12 Mother Popcorn (Live) 9:02


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May 22, 2014

RhoDeo 1420 Goldy Rhox 161

Hello, today the 161 st post of GoldyRhox, classic pop rock in the darklight an American rock band. The band has sold more than 40 million albums worldwide throughout their career. The group was inducted into The Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2004. Drummer John Hartman arrived in California in 1969 determined to meet Skip Spence of Moby Grape and join an aborted Grape reunion. Spence introduced Hartman to singer, guitarist and songwriter Tom Johnston and the two proceeded to form the nucleus of what would become today's mystery band.

In 1970 they teamed up with bass player Dave Shogren and singer, guitarist and songwriter Patrick Simmons. Simmons, who had belonged to several area groups (among them "Scratch", an acoustic trio with future bassist Tiran Porter) and also performed as a solo artist, was already an accomplished fingerstyle player whose approach to the instrument complemented Johnston's rhythmic R&B strumming. The band improved their playing by performing live all over Northern California in 1970. They attracted a particularly strong following among local chapters of the Hells Angels.

At this point in their history, the band's image reflected that of their biggest fans—leather jackets and motorcycles. However, the group's 1971 self-titled debut album departed significantly from that image and their live sound of the period. The album, which failed to chart, emphasized acoustic guitars and frequently reflected country influences. The bouncy lead-off song "Nobody", the band's first single, has surfaced in their live set several times over the ensuing decades.

In October 1971, the band recorded several songs for their second album with Shogren on bass, guitar & background vocals. But a little later, during the album's recording, Shogren left after disagreements with the group's new producer, Ted Templeman. Shogren was replaced in December 1971 with singer, songwriter and bass guitarist Tiran Porter, while Hossack was added to the lineup at the same time as a regular. Porter and Hossack were both stalwarts of the Northern California music scene, Porter brought a funkier bass style to the band and added his husky baritone to the voices of Johnston and Simmons, resulting in a rich three-part harmonic vocal blend.

The second album, which spawned the hits and classic rock staples, "Listen to the Music", and "Jesus Is Just Alright", brought the band their breakthrough success after its release in July 1972. In collaboration with manager Bruce Cohn, producer Ted Templeman and engineer Donn Landee, the band put forward a more polished and eclectic set of songs. Pianist Bill Payne of Little Feat contributed keyboards for the first time, beginning a decades-long collaboration that included many recording sessions and even a two-week stint touring with the band in early 1974. With an improved rhythm section and the songwriting of Johnston and Simmons, the band's trademark sound - an amalgam of R&B, country, bluegrass, hard rock, roadhouse boogie, funk, and rock and roll - emerged fully formed.

The band is still active though these past 4 decades there's been considerable rotation as to who's playing and meanwhile life has taken it's toll too.....

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Most of the albums i 'll post made many millions for the music industry and a lot of what i intend to post still gets repackaged and remastered decades later, squeezing the last drop of profit out of bands that for the most part have ceased to exist long ago, although sometimes they get lured out of the mothballs to do a big bucks gig or tour. Now i'm not as naive to post this kinda music for all to see and have deleted, these will be a black box posts, i'm sorry for those on limited bandwidth but for most of you a gamble will get you a quality rip don't like it, deleting is just 2 clicks...That said i will try to accommodate somewhat and produce some cryptic info on the artist and or album.

Today's mystery album is the second studio album by our mystery rock band , released in  Juli 1st 1972  the album is called after the name of a street in the French Quarter of New Orleans. The cover and inside centerfold photos were taken at a brothel on the same  Street. It's an album that has retained a lot of its freshness over the decades. Producer Ted Templeman was attuned to the slightly heavier and more Southern style the band wanted to work toward on this, their second album, and the results were not only profitable -- including a platinum record award -- but artistically impeccable. the mystery album is actually pretty close in style and sound at various points to what the Eagles were doing during the same period, except that  here the band threw jazz and R&B into the mix, as well as country, folk, and bluegrass elements, and (surprise!) ended up just about as ubiquitous as the Eagles in peoples' record collections, especially in the wake of the singles "Listen to the Music" and "Jesus Is Just Alright." But those two singles represented only the tip of the iceberg in terms of what this group had to offer, as purchasers of the album discovered even on the singles -- both songs appear here in distinctly longer versions, with more exposition and development, and in keeping with the ambitions that album cuts (even of popular numbers) were supposed to display in those days. Actually, "Listen to the Music" (written by Tom Johnston) offers subtle use of phasing and other studio tricks that make its seemingly earthy, laid-back approach some of the most complex and contrived of the period. Johnston's "Rockin' Down the Highway" shows the band working at a higher wattage and moving into Creedence Clearwater Revival territory, while "Mamaloi" was Patrick Simmons' laid-back Caribbean idyll, and the title tune (also by Simmons) is a hauntingly beautiful ballad. The band then switches gears into swamp rock for "Cotton Mouth" and takes a left turn into the Mississippi Delta for a version of Sonny Boy Williamson II's "Don't Start Me Talkin'" before shifting into a gospel mode with "Jesus Is Just Alright." Johnston's nearly seven-minute "Disciple" was the sort of soaring, bluesy hard rock workout that led to the group's comparison to the Allman Brothers Band, though their interlocking vocals were nearly as prominent as their crunching, surging double lead guitars and paired drummers. And it all still sounds astonishingly bracing decades later; it's still a keeper, and one of the most inviting and alluring albums of its era. Here in it's MFSL remaster



Goldy Rhox 161   (flac 215mb)

Goldy Rhox 161   (ogg 88mb)


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