Oct 31, 2017

RhoDeo 1744 Roots

Hello, after a somewhat strong response on last weeks classical roots it made sense to give Martha another look. And thus another extensive post today, no less then 7 albums by an an Argentine classical pianist, who is widely regarded as one of the greatest pianists of the second half of the 20th century.. Classical music they say its good for the brain and here it's brought to you with plenty of soul aswell   ....N'Joy

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Argerich was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her paternal ancestors were Catalans based in Buenos Aires since the 18th century. Her maternal grandparents were Jewish immigrants from the Russian Empire, who settled in Colonia Villa Clara in the Entre Ríos province—one of the colonies established by Baron de Hirsch and the Jewish Colonization Association. The provenance of the name Argerich is Catalonia, Spain. She started playing the piano at age three. At the age of five, she moved to teacher Vincenzo Scaramuzza, who stressed to her the importance of lyricism and feeling. Argerich gave her debut concert in 1949 at the age of eight.

The family moved to Europe in 1955, where Argerich studied with Friedrich Gulda in Austria. Juan Perón, then the president of Argentina, made their decision possible by appointing her parents to diplomatic posts in the Argentine Embassy in Vienna. She later studied with Stefan Askenase and Maria Curcio. Argerich also seized opportunities for brief periods of coaching with Madeleine Lipatti (widow of Dinu Lipatti), Abbey Simon, and Nikita Magaloff. In 1957, at sixteen, she won both the Geneva International Music Competition and the Ferruccio Busoni International Competition within three weeks of each other. It was at the latter that she met Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, whom she would later seek out for lessons during a personal artistic crisis at the age of twenty, though she only had four lessons with him in a year and a half. Her greatest influence was Gulda, with whom she studied for 18 months.

Argerich performed her debut concert at the age of 8, playing Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor and Beethoven's First Piano Concerto in C major. Argerich rose to international prominence when she won the seventh International Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw in 1965, at age 24. In that same year, she debuted in the United States in Lincoln Center's Great Performers Series. In 1960, she had made her first commercial recording, which included works by Chopin, Brahms, Ravel, Prokofiev, and Liszt; it received critical acclaim upon its release in 1961. In 1967, she recorded Chopin's Polonaise, Op. 53.

Argerich has often remarked in interviews of feeling "lonely" on stage during solo performances.[9] Since the 1980s, she has staged few solo performances, concentrating instead on concertos and, in particular, chamber music, and collaborating with instrumentalists in sonatas. She is noted especially for her recordings of 20th-century works by composers such as Rachmaninoff, Messiaen and Prokofiev. One notable compilation pairs Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 3 (recorded in December 1982 with the Radio Symphonie-Orchester Berlin under the direction of Riccardo Chailly) with Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 (February 1980, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Kirill Kondrashin).Argerich is also famous for her interpretation of Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3, Ravel's Piano Concerto in G, and Bach's Partita No. 2 in C minor, which she has recorded several times and continues to perform.

Argerich has also promoted younger pianists, both through her annual festival and through her appearances as a member of the jury at international competitions. The pianist Ivo Pogorelić was thrust into the musical spotlight partly as a result of Argerich's actions: after he was eliminated in the third round of the 1980 International Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw, Argerich proclaimed him a "genius" and left the jury in protest. She has supported several artists including Gabriela Montero, Mauricio Vallina, Sergio Tiempo, Gabriele Baldocci, Christopher Falzone and others.

Argerich is president of the International Piano Academy Lake Como and performs each year at the Lugano Festival. She also created and has been General Director of the Argerich Music Festival and Encounter in Beppu, Japan, since 1996. Argerich during a concert given in the Néstor Kirchner Cultural Centre, July 2015.
Her aversion to the press and publicity has resulted in her remaining out of the limelight for most of her career. Nevertheless, she is widely recognized as one of the greatest pianists of her time.

Her performance of Liszt's First Piano Concerto conducted by Daniel Barenboim at The Proms 2016 prompted this review in The Guardian: "It was an unforgettable performance. Argerich celebrated her 75th birthday in June this year, but that news doesn’t seem to have reached her fingers. Her playing is still as dazzling, as frighteningly precise, as it has always been; her ability to spin gossamer threads of melody as matchless as ever. This was unmistakably and unashamedly Liszt in the grand manner, a bit old-fashioned and sometimes even a bit vulgar at times, but in this of all concertos, with Barenboim and the orchestra following each twist and turn, every little quickening and moment of expressive reflection, it seemed entirely appropriate."

Argerich has been married three times. Her first marriage, to composer-conductor Robert Chen and with whom she had a daughter, violist Lyda Chen-Argerich, ended in 1964. From 1969 to 1973, Argerich was married to Swiss conductor Charles Dutoit, with whom she had a daughter, Annie Dutoit. Argerich continues to record and perform with Dutoit. In the 1970s she was also briefly married to pianist Stephen Kovacevich, with whom she has a daughter, Stéphanie.

In 1990, Argerich was diagnosed with malignant melanoma. After treatment, the cancer went into remission, but there was a recurrence in 1995, eventually metastasizing to her lungs and lymph nodes. Following an experimental treatment at the John Wayne cancer institute in Santa Monica pioneered by oncologist Donald Morton, Argerich's cancer went into remission again. In gratitude, Argerich performed a Carnegie Hall recital benefiting the Institute. As of 2017, Argerich remains cancer-free.

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Following the first volume of solo recordings, Vol. 2 of the Martha Argerich Collection features seven discs of the artist's treasured concerto recordings. Listeners who have not already heard the majority of these performances owe it to themselves to start now; this collection truly contains the vast majority of Argerich's most significant performances and legendary collaborations. From the cleanliness and precision of her Beethoven with Sinopoli, to the unbridled passion of her Schumann with Rostropovich, to the sheer elegance of her Ravel with Abbado, Argerich is an artist with nearly limitless technical capacity, interpretive abilities, and variety of color and tone. While all of the 16 concertos heard here are performed with the utmost in tempered musical expressiveness and precision, there are two definite standouts. Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto, performed with her then-husband Charles Dutoit and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, is filled with as much power and vehemence as could ever be expected. Coupled with the surprising muscularity of Argerich's playing is a gracefully nimble touch in the concerto's rapid passagework that will capture listeners' attention from note one. Prokofiev's Third Concerto is a work with which Argerich has had a very special relationship, earning her high marks for her singular interpretation of the fiendishly difficult concerto. The recording featured here with Claudio Abbado and the Berlin Philharmonic is among the finest made of the piece.



Martha Argerich - The Collection 2 (01+02)   (flac  498mb)

Concerto No. 3 In C Major Op. 26 27:05
101 1. Andante - Allegro 9:01
102 2. Thema: Andantino - Variation I: L'istesso Tempo - Var. II: Allegro - Var. III: Allegro Moderato 9:03
103 3. Allegro Ma Non Troppo 9:01
Concerto In G Major 21:07
104 1. Allegramente 8:09
105 2. Adagio Assai 9:03
106 3. Presto 3:55

cd 2
Concerto No. 1 In E Minor Op. 11 37:58
201 1. Allegro Maestoso 18:57
202 2. Romance: Larghetto 9:58
203 3. Rondo: Vivace 9:03
Concerto No. 1 In E Flat Major 17:36
204 1. Allegro Maestoso 5:09
205 2. Quasi Adagio 8:26
205 3. Allegretto Vivace - Allegro Animato
206 4. Allegretto Marziale Animato 4:01
Concerto In G Major 22:13
207 1. Allegramente 8:43
208 2. Adagio Assai 9:33
209 3. Presto 3:57

Martha Argerich - The Collection 2 (01+02)   (ogg  254mb)

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Martha Argerich - The Collection 2 (03)   (flac  309mb)

Concerto No. 1 In B Flat Minor Op. 23 35:39
301 1. Allegro Non Troppo E Molto Maestoso - Allegro Con Spirito 21:16
302 2. Andante Semplice 7:31
303 3. Allegro Con Fuoco 6:52
Concerto For Violin, Piano And String Orchestra In D Minor 36:39
304 1. Allegro 18:27
305 2. Adagio 9:12
306 3. Allegro Molto 9:00

Martha Argerich - The Collection 2 (03) (ogg  149mb)

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Martha Argerich - The Collection 2 (04+05)     (flac  480mb)

Concerto In A Minor Op. 54 29:45
4-1 1. Allegro Affettuoso 14:24
4-2 2. Intermezzo: Andantino - Attacca: 5:09
4-3 3. Allegro Vivace 10:12
Concerto No. 2 In F Minor Op. 21 30:48
4-4 1. Maestoso 14:02
4-5 2. Larghetto 8:50
4-6 3. Allegro Vivace 7:56

cd 5
Concerto No. 1 In C Major Op. 15 35:13
5-1 1. Allegro Con Brio 14:10
5-2 2. Largo 12:05
5-3 3. Rondo: Allegro 8:58
Concerto No. 2 In B Flat Major Op. 19 30:05
5-4 1. Allegro Con Brio 14:09
5-5 2. Adagio 9:53
5-6 3. Rondo: Molto Allegro 6:03

Martha Argerich - The Collection 2 (04+05) (ogg  251mb )

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Martha Argerich - The Collection 2 ( 06+07) (flac  535mb)

Concerto For Piano And String Orchestra Op. 35 22:43
601 1. Allegro Moderato - Attacca 6:06
602 2. Lento - Attacca 8:23
603 3. Moderato - Attacca 1:43
604 4. Allegro Con Brio 6:31
Concerto In D Major Hob.XVIII:11 18:50
605 1. Vivace 7:28
606 2. Un Poco Adagio 7:22
607 3. Rondo All'Ungarese: Allegro Assai 4:00
Concerto No. 1 In B Flat Minor Op. 23 32:11
608 1. Allegro Non Troppo E Molto Maestoso - Allegro Con Spirito 9:12
609 2. Andantino Semplice 6:30
610 3. Allegro Con Fuoco 6:19

cd 7
Concerto No. 3 In C Minor Op. 37 35:42
701 1. Allegro Con Brio 16:11
702 2. Largo 10:21
703 3. Rondo: Allegro 9:10
Concerto No. 2 In B Falt Major Op. 19 28:12
704 1. Allegro Con Brio 13:20
705 2. Adagio 8:49
706 3. Rondo: Molto Allegro 6:03

Martha Argerich - The Collection 2 ( 06+07) (ogg  279mb)

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Oct 30, 2017

RhoDeo 1744 Mars 08

Hello, F1 talk, when Vettel set the fastest lap of the day, shortly before the finish he was being chased by Max Verstappen, no suprise for the latecomer only Vettel was shortly before getting a blue flag because Max would have loved to overtake no 4 in the race too. Max won the battle at the start he was lucky not getting his tires slashed by Vettel Hamilton however did receive that honor Vettel needed a new frontwing but still had 20 seconds on Hamilton when re entering the race at the back. The latter found adjusting to overtaking without a blue flag difficult as clearly the Mercedes is build to lead by the time he got his rhythm going he had already been lapped by Verstappen (lap 22) who cruised to victory in the only Renault that made it to the finish, hence the apprehension at Red Bull who tried to convince Max to take it easy only to get told "but I'm taking it easy". Leading from start to finish what a great comeback after the snub from the FIA last week. Bottas and Raikonen # 2 and 3 were way back, not much racing going on in the top 10 until Vettel arrived and later Hamilton for spot 9, more then enough for his 4th world title, 2 races before the end of saison. Ferrari and Vettel dropped the ball, big mistakes that cost us viewers tension until the flag drops on the last race at Abu Dahbi.



Today's artist was an American author and screenwriter. He worked in a variety of genres, including fantasy, science fiction, horror and mystery fiction. Widely known for his dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953), and his science fiction and horror story collections The Martian Chronicles (1950), The Illustrated Man (1951), and I Sing the Body Electric (1969), our man was one of the most celebrated 20th- and 21st-century American writers. While most of his best known work is in speculative fiction, he also wrote in other genres, such as the coming-of-age novel Dandelion Wine (1957) or the fictionalized memoir Green Shadows, White Whale (1992).

Recipient of numerous awards, including a 2007 Pulitzer Citation, Bradbury also wrote and consulted on screenplays and television scripts, many of his works were adapted to comic book, television and film formats. On his death in 2012, The New York Times called Bradbury "the writer most responsible for bringing modern science fiction into the literary mainstream.... N'joy.

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The Ray Bradbury Theater is an anthology series that ran for two seasons on HBO, three episodes per season from 1985 to 1986, and four additional seasons on USA Network from 1988 to 1992. It was later shown in reruns on the Sci Fi Channel. All 65 episodes were written by Ray Bradbury and many were based on short stories or novels he had written, including "A Sound of Thunder", "Marionettes, Inc.", "Banshee", "The Playground", "Mars is Heaven", "Usher II", "The Jar", "The Long Rain", "The Veldt", "The Small Assassin", "The Pedestrian", "The Fruit at the Bottom of the Bowl", "Here There Be Tygers", "The Toynbee Convector", and "Sun and Shadow".

Many of the episodes focused on only one of Bradbury's original works. However, Bradbury occasionally included elements from his other works. "Marionettes, Inc." featured Fantoccini, a character from "I Sing the Body Electric!". "Gotcha!" included an opening sequence taken from "The Laurel and Hardy Love Affair". Characters were renamed, and elements added to the original works to expand the story to 23–28 minutes or to better suit the television medium.

Each episode would begin with a shot of Bradbury in his office, gazing over mementos of his life, which he states (in narrative) are used to spark ideas for stories. During the first season, Bradbury sometimes appeared on-screen in brief vignettes introducing the story. During the second season, Bradbury provided the opening narration with no specific embellishment concerning the episode. During the third season, a foreshortened version of the narration was used and Bradbury would add specific comments relevant to the episode presented. During the fourth and later seasons, a slightly shorter generic narration was used with no additional comments.

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The Ray Bradbury Theater 19 The Dwarf (avi  292mb)

Every night, a tiny man visits the carnival's hall of mirrors to stare at a mirror that makes him look much taller. Carny worker Aimee finds herself drawn to this lonely sad man and befriends him. Her boss cruelly pranks him. Big mistake.


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The people of Earth are preparing for war—a war that could potentially destroy the planet. Explorers are sent to Mars to find a new place for humans to colonize. Bradbury's Mars is a place of hope, dreams, and metaphor—of crystal pillars and fossil seas—where a fine dust settles on the great empty cities of a silently destroyed civilization. It is here the invaders have come to despoil and commercialize, to grow and to learn—first a trickle, then a torrent, rushing from a world with no future toward a promise of tomorrow. The Earthman conquers Mars...and then is conquered by it, lulled by dangerous lies of comfort and familiarity, and enchanted by the lingering glamour of an ancient, mysterious native race.

Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles is presented here as a full cast audio production with an original music score and thousands of sound effects by the award winning Colonial Radio Theatre on the Air. It marks their fourth collaboration with one of the most celebrated fiction writers of our time—Ray Bradbury.



Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 08 (mp3  26mb)

08 The Martian Chronicles 28:53



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previously

Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 01 (mp3  22mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 02 (mp3  22mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 03 (mp3  20mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 04 (mp3  22mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 05 (mp3  21mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 06 (mp3  21mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 07 (mp3  26mb)

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Oct 29, 2017

Sundaze 1744

Hello, The F1 circus is in Mexico city this weekend that means high altitude racing, Max Verstappen was about to become the youngest driver ever on pole, but like what happened at Monza in the final qualifyinbg lap he was passed by a worldchampion then it was Hamilton, here it was Vettel 86 milli seconds faster, he's on pole today. I reckon Hamilton who's third thinks those two in front of me will take eachother out, jippy. Well we'll see



Today the final Vidna Obmana post An Opera For Four Fusion Works ...N'Joy

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Belgian producer Dirk Serries, aka Vidna Obmana, is a prolific composer of deep ambient and electro-acoustic music, utilizing slow, shifting electronic figures and sparse environmental recordings to construct long, minimalist, often extremely personal textural works. Taking his nom de plume from the Yugoslavian for "optical illusion" (a concept which carries much weight in his composing, as well), Serries has released material through a wide range of different labels, including Projekt, Amplexus, Extreme, Hic Sunt Leones, Syrenia, ND, and Multimood. Born and raised in Antwerp, Serries began recording experimental noise musics in the late '80s, working solo and in combination with artists such as PBK, exploring the more abrasive side of electronic composition. Beginning with the release in 1990 of Shadowing in Sorrow, however, (the first part of what would come to be known as Vidna's ambient Trilogy) Serries began moving toward an almost isolationist ambient aesthetic, exploring themes of calm, solitude, grief, and introspection in long, moving pieces which tended to chart similar ground as American space music artists such as Robert Rich, Michael Stearns, and Steve Roach (Serries has since collaborated with both Rich and Roach). The first two movements of the Trilogy -- Sorrow, as well as its follow-up Passage in Beauty -- were self-released by Serries in 1990 and 1991, with the third volume, Ending Mirag, appearing the following year on the American ND label. The album was praised as some of the finest post-classical experimental electronic music of its time, and the Stateside connection finally opened his music up to an American audience, leading also to his association with Sam Rosenthal's Projekt label (the entire Trilogy was finally reissued by Projekt sister label Relic as a boxed set in 1996, with several new Vidna releases also appearing in the interim).

Although his textural recordings form the core of his output to date, Serries' more recent solo and collaborative works (such as The Transcending Quest, Echoing Delight, and The Spiritual Bonding) have also found him pushing the minimalism of his earlier works into the Fourth World territories of artists such as Jorge Reyes, Michael Stearns, and Jon Hassell, setting lush, dreamy soundscapes in a larger, more engaging rhythmic framework (usually with contributions from percussionists Djen Ajakan Shean and Steve Roach). Still, as many compilations and retrospectives of his earlier or unreleased work have appeared in recent times so as to confuse somewhat the trajectory of his development, which at any rate seems to trade more or less equally between the freeform conceptual landscapes of his earlier Projekt, Relic, and ND works and the more structured interactivity of the Extreme and Amplexus releases. Collaborations have also increasingly occupied Serries' time, with full-length works with Steve Roach (Well of Souls, The Spiritual Bonding), Robert Rich (The Spiritual Bonding), Asmus Tietchens (a self-titled collaboration for Syrenia), Sam Rosenthal (Terrace Of Memories), and Djen Ajakan Shean (Parallel Flaming) appearing all within the space of only a few years. Both Landscape in Obscurity and The Shape of Solitude followed in 1999, and in the spring of 2000 Obmana returned with Echo Passage and Surreal Sanctuary. Subterranean Collective was issued the following year.

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An Opera for Four Fusion Works by vidnaObmana , is a composition composed over a period of several years (2001-2006). It is neither an opera nor fusion in the familiar musical meanings of the words. The terms opera and fusion show that it is a collection of works (opera is plural of opus ) and fusion stands for the integration of another's compositions in Serry's work, a kind of sampling .

What does point to a classic opera is a division into acts and, as it were, other people's music. The whole consists of four, each of which has been chosen to be recycled by Serries. Acte I has the guitar as the main instrument, Acte II the soprano saxophone , Acte III the piano and Acte IV dedicated to multi instrumentalist Steven Wilson , but only his voice has been used.

VidnaObmana's music takes a unique position within the ambient . He is one of the few who insists isolationism within the genre. That flow, through its endless repetition, causes an uncomfortable feeling. It has to be borne in mind, that was seen from the ambient and new age . The flow is not as dark as the doombient , the very dark branch of ambient.

By virtue of the almost endless repetition of fragments etc. the music is also divided into minimal music . If one approaches the music from that view, there is hardly any uncomfortable feeling, the music creates a trance, similar to one of the first compositions of Terry Riley and Philip Glass , especially Music in Twelve Parts of the latter. This last job delivers or trance on whether one is annoyed by the (than annoying) repetitions. The music of this composition, however, is not as intrusive as Music in Twelve Parts, but it continues to be quiet.

Finally, there is another type of music that shows the album. Due to the quiet nature of the music, which seems to be slipping, it sounds like someone is making a long trip and produces a melody that's not finished yet to wake himself up. Comparison with the Joik of the Saami urges in Act IV, as a voice, which is recognizable as a voice, but the text is not yet composed of the melody. It remains with a murmur that drives away time. The same goes for the other three actions that can be considered as joiks from the electronic age.

Act One: Echoes of Steel (Featuring Dreams in Exile) has five scenes, all of which star Serries on guitars, e-bow, synths, vocals, and endless recycling. He recorded these stunning atmospheres over 13 months, from April of 2001 through May of 2002. This is cutting edge e-music. Serries combines acoustics, electronics, and processes expertly to forge a unique experimental sound that shimmers. The organic textures are harsh and cold. The exiled dreams are in different worlds. The atmospheres provide structure for the soundscapes and have no structure. This ambiguity defines the existentialism of Serries' sound worlds. The unique experience has no valid comparison.



Vidna Obmana - Act 1, Echoes of Steel (flac 315mb)

01 IV 17:07
02 V 7:33
03 III 8:51
04 II 9:30
05 I 9:33

Vidna Obmana - Act 1, Echoes of Steel  (ogg 127mb)

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Vidna Obmana - Act 2, Phrasing The Air (flac  280mb)

01 I 7:07
02 II 14:29
03 VI 10:15
04 V 19:15
05 IV 9:51

Vidna Obmana - Act 2, Phrasing The Air  (ogg  124mb)

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Vidna Obmana - Act 3, Reflection On Scale (flac  284mb)

01 I 24:08
02 II 14:47
03 III 14:02
04 IV 8:28
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Vidna Obmana - Act 3, Reflection On Scale  (ogg  143mb)

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Vidna Obmana - Act 4, Bowing Harmony  (flac 228mb)

01 II 6:06
02 IV 9:11
03 VI 3:57
04 III 23:59

 Vidna Obmana - Act 4, Bowing Harmony   (ogg  86mb )

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Oct 28, 2017

RhoDeo 1743 Grooves

Hello, lots of trouble with my provider they disconnected me and then reconnected but something went wrong there, no phone and no internet, got another modem, same problem went back with it this afternoon and this time this extra modem is initiated and working hurrah ! Got to say though i'm lucky as one of the 2 service centers in my country is downtown where i live otherwise this 'drama' would have continued or maybe not because clearly the reconnecting at the service center went wrong 2 days without internet that's tough no re-ups this week but that means a bigger one next time.

Meanwhile a little later as usual Grooves


Today's artists are an American funk band from Long Beach, California, known for the hit songs "Spill the Wine", "The World Is a Ghetto", "The Cisco Kid", "Why Can't We Be Friends?", "Low Rider", and "Summer". War is a musical crossover band which fuses elements of rock, funk, jazz, Latin, rhythm and blues, and reggae. Their album The World Is a Ghetto was the best-selling album of 1973. The band also transcended racial and cultural barriers with a multi-ethnic line-up. The band was also subject to many line-up changes over the course of its formation, leaving member Leroy "Lonnie" Jordan as the only original member in the current line-up.  ........ N'joy

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Eric Burdon was a founding member and vocalist of the Animals, a band originally formed in Newcastle in the early 1960s. The Animals were one of the leading bands of the "British Invasion", and the band had quite a following around the world. Along with The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Dave Clark Five, and Gerry and The Pacemakers, they introduced British music and fashion to an entire generation in an explosion of great tunes and outspoken attitude on, and off the stage. Burdon sang on such Animal classics as "The House of the Rising Sun", "Good Times", "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood", "Bring It On Home to Me", and "We Gotta Get Out of this Place". The Animals combined the traditional blues with rock to create a unique sound. By 1966 the original members had left, except for Barry Jenkins, and the band was reformed as Eric Burdon and the Animals later going through several line-up changes, the New Animals .This lasted until 1969.

War formed out of the ashes of an earlier R&B covers group, The Creators. In 1968, the band was reconfigured and dubbed Nightshift; Peter Rosen was the new bassist, and percussionist Thomas Sylvester "Papa Dee" Allen, who'd previously played with Dizzy Gillespie, came onboard, along with two more horn players. In 1969 they were discovered by producer Jerry Goldstein, he suggested the band as possible collaborators to former Animals lead singer Eric Burdon, who along with Danish-born harmonica player Lee Oskar had been searching L.A. clubs for a new act.

After witnessing Nightshift in concert, Burdon took charge of the group. He gave them a provocative new name, War, and replaced the two extra horn players with Oskar. To develop material, War began playing marathon concert jams over which Burdon would free-associate lyrics. In August 1969, Burdon and War entered the studio for the first time, and after some more touring, they recorded their first album, 1970's Eric Burdon Declares War. The spaced-out daydream of "Spill the Wine" was a smash hit, climbing to number three and establishing the group in the public eye. A second album, The Black Man's Burdon, was released before the year's end, and over the course of two records it documented the group's increasingly long improvisations.

Burdon's contract allowed War to be signed separately, and they soon inked a deal with United Artists, intending to record on their own as well as maintaining their partnership with Burdon. Burdon -- citing exhaustion -- suddenly quit during the middle of the group's European tour in 1971, spelling the beginning of the end; he rejoined War for a final U.S. tour and then left for good.

In 1971 Burdon began a solo career. Around this time, he also recorded the album Guilty! He has led a number of groups named Eric Burdon Band or some variation thereof, with constantly changing personnel. Burdon rejoined briefly with the other original Animals in 1976 and 1983, but neither union lasted. His popularity has remained stronger in continental Europe than in the UK or U.S. Today he continues to record and tour either on his own, or in front of yet another version of "Eric Burdon and the Animals" as Black & White Blues

War had already issued their self-titled, Burdon-less debut at the beginning of 1971, but it flopped. Before the year was out, they recorded another effort, All Day Music, which spawned their first Top 40 hits in "All Day Music" and "Slippin' Into Darkness". The follow-up album, 1972's The World Is a Ghetto; boosted by a sense of multicultural harmony, topped the charts and sold over three million copies, making it the best-selling album of 1973. Deliver the Word was another million-selling hit, though it had less of the urban grit that War prided themselves on. War consolidated their success with the double concert LP War Live, recorded over four nights in Chicago during 1974.

Released in 1975, Why Can't We Be Friends returned to the sound of The World Is a Ghetto with considerable success. The bright, anthemic title track hit the Top Ten, as did "Low Rider," an irresistible slice of Latin funk that became the group's first (and only) R&B chart-topper, and still stands as their best-known tune. 1976 brought the release of a greatest-hits package featuring the new song "Summer," which actually turned out to be War's final Top Ten pop hit. A double-LP compilation of jams and instrumentals appeared on the Blue Note jazz label in 1977, under the title Platinum Jazz; it quickly became one of the best-selling albums in Blue Note history.

In 1977, the band switched labels, moving to MCA for Galaxy; though it sold respectably, and the title track was a hit on the R&B charts, disco was beginning to threaten the gritty, socially aware funk War specialized in, and it proved to be the last time War would hit the Top 40. After completing the Youngblood soundtrack album in 1978, the original War lineup began to disintegrate.

Things started to go downhill for the group in the late 70s when bassist B.B. Dickerson left and another member, Charles Miller, was murdered. Various line-up changes followed but the original magic was lost and the group were not as successful, eventually becoming just a touring act. Papa Dee Allen collapsed and died on-stage of a brain aneurysm in 1988, leaving Jordan, Hammon, Oskar, and Scott as the core membership. Interest in War's classic material remained steady, as they have been heavily sampled by hip-hop artists creating a new generation that discovered the music of War. The band continues to tour, although with only one of the original members.

On 21 April 2008, Eric Burdon and War reunited for the first time in 37 years to perform a one-time-only concert at the London Royal Albert Hall. The reunion was actually only between Eric Burdon and Lonnie Jordan, as the other original surviving members had not been asked to be a part of the reunion. The concert coincided with Avenue / Rhino Records' Eric Burdon and War reissues which included Eric Burdon Declares "War" and The Black-Man's Burdon, plus compilations The Best of Eric Burdon and War and Anthology. In 2008, Lonnie Jordan's edition of War released a live album / DVD of songs originally from 1969 to 1975: Greatest Hits Live. War were unsuccessfully nominated for 2009 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[10] There were rumours that Burdon would join them again in summer 2009, but it did not happen. In 2011, War played "Low Rider" and many other hits at the Rack n' Roll in Stamford, Connecticut with Remember September and Westchester School of Rock.

In 2014 the "new" War released a new studio album Evolutionary, coupled with  a remasterd edition of their smash hitsampler from 1976. Also in 2014, War was a nominee for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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War's third album as an act separate from Eric Burdon was also far and away their most popular, the group's only long-player to top the pop charts. The culmination of everything they'd been shooting for creatively on their two prior albums, it featured work in both succinct pop-accessible idioms ("The Cisco Kid," etc.) as well as challenging extended pieces such as the 13-minute "City, Country, City" -- which offered featured spots to all seven members without ever seeming disjointed -- and the title track, and encompass not only soul and funk but elements of blues and psychedelia on works such as the exquisite "Four Cornered Room." "The Cisco Kid" and "The World Is a Ghetto" understandably dominated the album's exposure, but there's much more to enjoy here, even decades on. Beyond the quality of the musicianship, the classy, forward-looking production has held up remarkably well, and not just on the most famous cuts here; indeed, The World Is a Ghetto is of a piece with Marvin Gaye's What's Going On and Curtis Mayfield's Curtis, utilizing the most sophisticated studio techniques of the era. Not only does it sound great, but there are important touches such as the phasing in "Four Cornered Room," not only on the percussion but also on the vocals, guitars, and other instruments, and the overall effect is a seemingly contradictory (yet eminently workable) shimmering blues, even working in a mournful and unadorned harmonica amid the more complex sounds.



War - The World Is A Ghetto    (flac  449mb)

01 The Cisco Kid4:35
02 Where Was You At 3:25
03 City, Country, City 13:18
04 Four Cornered Room 8:30
05 The World Is A Ghetto 10:10
06 Beetles In The Bog 3:51
Bonus Ghetto Jams
07 Freight Train Jam 5:41
08 58 Blues 5:29
09 War Is Coming (Blues Version) 6:15
10 The World Is A Ghetto (Rehearsal Take) 8:06

War - The World Is A Ghetto  (ogg  175mb)

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War Live -- also sometimes known simply as Live -- was recorded just as the group was achieving a peak of popularity and virtuosity; it was released 16 months later amid a string of highly successful studio LPs. Underappreciated at the time, it was recorded at a late November show at the High Chaparral in Chicago. The group had been engaged earlier the same year in a national tour as the opening act for Isaac Hayes and was reportedly so good that Hayes kept extending the length of their opening set.

This album is badass and if you're a fan of War enough where you'd go out and buy an album then you should definitely own this live album cut during the band's peak. The only negitive sentiment I could share is there aren't enough songs. Four of the nine tracks on this album make up two really long jammed out versions of two of War's best tunes in my opinion, "Slippin' Into Darkness" and "Get Down". These tunes are awesome but I don't know if many will find they justify the 29 minutes they collectively take up on this album. They're complete with percussion & drumset solos the likes of Ginger Baker's famous "Toad" drum solo and a wild harmonica solo on "Slippin' part 2". The tunes they play are inspired and the band is tight and razor sharp. Another major plus is the sound quality is top notch for a live album from this era. The real tragedy is the cd copy of this album isn't to easy to find so get it while you can. It blows away the live stuff that's out from the band's twilight years where you've got only one of the original members and the great multi part vocal arrangements aren't anything like they were in their hey day.



 War - Live !    (flac 515mb)

01 Introduction By E. Rodney Jones Of Radio Station WVON, Chicago, Ill. 0:31
02 Sun Oh Son 10:39
03 The Cisco Kid 6:05
04 Slippin' Into Darkness 9:45
05 Slippin' Part 2 8:52
06 All Day Music 10:09
07 Ballero 8:29
08 Lonely Feelin' 3:00
19 Get Down 20:30

War - Live !  (ogg  200mb )

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Focusing in part on their softer side, War unleashed Deliver the Word in fall 1973. A smooth blend of the band's more progressive jazz-rock fusion, the LP shot to the top of the R&B charts, their second of four number one records in a row. It was a perfect tonic to the mediocre MOR music rampaging its way through the early part of the decade. The opening "H2 Overture" is a restrained jazz jam that gives way to "In Your Eyes," which keeps the progressive momentum going but adds unexpected vocal twists that vary from interesting spoken pleasures to full vocal harmonies -- it's sex on a groove. Both "Southern Part of Texas" and a long-awaited studio recording of "Baby Brother -- now titled "Me and Baby Brother" -- swing the band back to their alter ego cutting-edge funk stomp. "Gypsy Man," meanwhile, is a near-12-minute mantric, tantric opus whose blues riffs are pinned down only by the song's low, unyielding rhythm. It's a memorable slab of pure prog passed through Lee Oskar's stroboscopic brain. An outstanding album split between War's two definitive styles, Deliver the Word ultimately delivers a vibe, a groove, and an intent that are hard to resist. A magical ride with plenty of surprises to keep the listener on his or her toes, this set is a perfect example of the band at their genre-fusing best.



War - Deliver the Word   (flac 234mb)

01 H2 Overture 4:38
02 In Your Eyes 4:22
03 Gypsy Man 11:35
04 Me And Baby Brother 3:30
05 Deliver The Word 7:48
06 Southern Part Of Texas 6:22
07 Blisters 2:21

. War - Deliver the Word  (ogg  93mb)

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Cut from the same cloth as the band's 1973 Deliver the Word LP, War's 1975 Why Can't We Be Friends? is a masterpiece in its scope and breadth. And, emerging as the last work the band would do for its longtime label, United Artists, it became a fitting swansong, powering up the charts and giving War its fourth and final number one hit. In recent years, the album has been overshadowed by the monstrously popular bass-beating and bright brass of its singular hit, "Low Rider." Indeed, the song would become the band's signature theme, as the Latino street-cruiser jam quickly became a live set staple and, much later, was reinvigorated through sampling on songs by the Beastie Boys, Stereo MC's, and Offspring. However, that one track, iconographic as it is, is by no means the only treat onboard Why Can't We Be Friends? There are far more interesting and superb treats roiling in the wake of "Low Rider." The snappy title track, which poses the question of the decade and, oddly, closes the album, is a feel-good thumper. Its bright brass punctuation and rakish vocals are wonderfully combined with an absolutely contagious reggae beat. Then, add the doesn't-get-much-better-than-that medley "Leroy's Latin Lament." Divided into four "songs," the music swings from the smart vocal opening "Lonnie Dreams" to the effervescent Latin jam of "La Fiesta." And, of course, where there's War, there's funk -- this time on the seven-plus minute"Heartbeat." Wrap it all up with the poignant ballad "Lotus Blossom," and the result is pretty much perfection. Why Can't We Be Friends? remains one of War's truly outstanding efforts, and has become an integral part of the funk genre's landscape. It also remains the nightcap of their finest hour. War's ill-timed move to MCA changed the energy and focus of the band forever.



War - Why Can't We Be Friends     (flac 289mb)

01 Don't Let No One Get You Down 3:59
02 Lotus Blossom 3:59
03 Heartbeat 7:25
04 Leroy's Latin Lament (Medley) 6:44
+++Lonnie Dreams 0:49
+++The Way We Feel 1:10
+++La Fiesta 2:10
+++Lament 2:27
05 Smile Happy 7:22
06 So 4:48
07 Low Rider 3:11
08 In Mazatlan 2:45
09 Why Can't We Be Friends ? 3:49

.War - Why Can't We Be Friends  (ogg  109mb)

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Oct 25, 2017

RhoDeo 1743 Aetix

Hello,


Today's artist is a German countertenor noted for his wide vocal range and an unusual, otherworldly stage persona. He was known for his bizarrely visionary theatrical live performances, heavy make-up, unusual costumes, and a highly stylized signature hairdo which flaunted a receding hairline. His songs were equally unusual, ranging from synthesizer-laden interpretations of classical opera to covers of 1960s pop standards..........N'Joy

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Klaus Nomi was born Klaus Sperber in Immenstadt, Bavaria, Germany on January 24, 1944. In the 1960s, he worked as an usher at the Deutsche Oper in West Berlin where he sang for the other ushers and maintenance crew on stage in front of the fire curtain after performances. Around that time he also sang opera arias at the Berlin gay discothèque Kleist Casino. Nomi moved to New York City in 1972. He began his involvement with the art scene based in the East Village. According to a documentary film made by Andrew Horn, Nomi took singing lessons and supported himself working as a pastry chef.

In 1972, Nomi appeared in a satirical camp production of Richard Wagner's Das Rheingold at Charles Ludlam's Ridiculous Theater Company as the Rheinmaidens and the Wood Bird. Nomi came to the attention of New York City's art scene in 1978 with his performance in "New Wave Vaudeville", a four-night event MC'd by artist David McDermott. Dressed in a skin-tight spacesuit with clear plastic cape, Nomi sang the aria Mon cœur s'ouvre à ta voix ("My heart opens to your voice") from Camille Saint-Saëns' 1877 opera Samson et Dalila. The performance ended with a chaotic crash of strobe lights, smoke bombs, and loud electronic sound effects as Nomi backed away into the smoke. Joey Arias recalled: "I still get goose pimples when I think about it... It was like he was from a different planet and his parents were calling him home. When the smoke cleared, he was gone." The reaction was so overwhelmingly positive that he was invited to perform at clubs all over New York City.

At the New Wave Vaudeville show Klaus Nomi met Kristian Hoffman, songwriter for the Mumps. Hoffman was a performer and MC in the second incarnation of New Wave Vaudeville and a close friend of Susan Hannaford and Tom Scully, who produced the show, and Ann Magnuson, who directed it. Anya Phillips, then manager of James Chance and the Contortions, suggested Nomi and Hoffman form a band. Hoffman became Nomi's de facto musical director, assembling a band that included Page Wood from another New Wave vaudeville act, Come On, and Joe Katz, who was concurrently in The Student Teachers, the Accidents, and The Mumps. Hoffman helped Nomi choose his pop covers, including the Lou Christie song "Lightnin' Strikes." Hoffman wrote several pop songs with which Nomi is closely identified: "The Nomi Song", "Total Eclipse", "After The Fall", and "Simple Man", the title song of Nomi's second RCA French LP. This configuration of the Klaus Nomi band performed at Manhattan clubs, including several performances at Max's Kansas City, Danceteria and Hurrah. Disagreements with the management Nomi engaged led to a dissolution of this band, and Nomi continued without them.

In the late 1970s while performing at Club 57, The Mudd Club, The Pyramid Club, and other venues, Nomi assembled a group of up-and-coming models, singers, artists, and musicians to perform live with him, which at times included Joey Arias, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, John Sex and Kenny Scharf.[8] He also appeared on Manhattan Cable's TV Party. David Bowie heard about Nomi's performances in New York and soon met him and Joey Arias at the Mudd Club. Bowie hired them as performers and backup singers for his appearance on Saturday Night Live which aired on December 15, 1979. The band performed "TVC 15", "The Man Who Sold the World", and "Boys Keep Swinging". During the performance of "TVC 15", Nomi and Arias dragged around a large prop pink poodle with a television screen in its mouth. Nomi was so impressed with the plastic quasi-tuxedo suit that Bowie wore during "The Man Who Sold the World" that he commissioned one to be made for himself. Nomi can be seen wearing the suit on the cover of his self-titled album, as well as during a number of his music videos. Nomi wore his variant of the outfit, in monochromatic black-and-white with spandex and makeup to match, until the last few months of his life. Klaus Nomi released his second album, Simple Man, in November 1982.


Nomi also collaborated with producer Man Parrish. He appeared on Parrish's album Hip Hop Bee Bop as a backup vocalist on the track "Six Simple Synthesizers." He played a supporting role as a Nazi official in Anders Grafstrom's 1980 underground film The Long Island Four. The 1981 rock documentary film, Urgh! A Music War, features Nomi's live performance of Total Eclipse.[8] His performance of Mon cœur s'ouvre à ta voix was used as the music for the closing credits. 666 Fifth Avenue was listed as the contact address in the liner notes of Nomi's 1981 self-titled record.

In the last several months of his life, Nomi changed his focus to operatic pieces; to fit, he adopted a Baroque era operatic outfit complete with full collar as his typical on-stage attire in this time frame. The collar helped cover the outbreaks of Kaposi's sarcoma forming on his neck, one of the numerous AIDS-related diseases Nomi developed toward the end of his life. Nomi was reported to be gay; before his illness, there was speculation that he was asexual. Nomi died on August 6, 1983 at the Sloan Kettering Hospital Center in New York City, one of the first celebrities to die of complications from AIDS. His ashes were scattered over New York City.

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It only takes a quick look at the cover to get a reasonably decent idea that this isn't your typical pop album: Decked out in a grossly oversized suit and heavy theatrical makeup, Klaus Nomi is not your typical pop singer, either. Both the cover and the music within lean heavily to the dramatic -- Nomi's delivery is all in a very operatic falsetto, though most of the music itself is more of the early-'80s European dance school (indeed, one of his collaborators here was Man Parrish, probably best-known for his later work with Man 2 Man). Only one of the tracks here was self-penned; rather, Nomi gets down to work here as an interpreter, turning in suitably skewed versions of "Lightning Strikes" and Chubby Checker's "The Twist." The real highlights here are his take on Kristian Hoffman's song "Total Eclipse," and a rather straight (ahem) reading of the aria from Saint-Saens' classical work Samson and Delilah. It's pretty hard to imagine your typical classical music buff embracing this song, let alone the entire album, but fans of off-kilter pop music will certainly find a lot to love about this album.



Klaus Nomi - Klaus Nomi   (flac  177mb)

01 Keys Of Life 2:26
02 Lightning Strikes 2:59
03 The Twist 3:10
04 Nomi Song 2:47
05 You Don't Own Me 3:39
06 The Cold Song 4:03
07 Wasting My Time 4:16
08 Total Eclipse 3:29
09 Nomi Chant 1:53
10 Samson And Delilah (Aria) 3:43

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Coming off such a left-field debut, it was up in the air as to what Klaus Nomi would do for a follow-up. That second album was Simple Man, and if listeners were unsure if the first album was a put-on, this one certainly didn't do much to clear things up. While the album starts out promisingly with an atmospheric fade-in followed by a hard dance number with the occasional Birthday Party-style guitar thrown in, the rest of the album did its damnedest to move the album's overall tone to one of self-parody. Could one really think any differently listening to the hyper-sugary cover of "Just One Look," the faux-country disco number "Rubberband Lazer," or the version of "Ding Dong the Witch Is Dead"? As with the debut album, Nomi's true capabilities are shown off by his versions of classical works -- in this case, "Death" (taken from Henry Purcell's "Dido and Aeneas") and "Return" (which is based on a choral number by John Dowland). The thing is, those pieces are right at the end of the album and the listeners who would enjoy them the most will probably already have been long shaken off by all of the kitsch leading up to it.



Klaus Nomi - Simple Man (flac 227mb)

01 From Beyond 2:51
02 After The Fall 4:43
03 Just One Look 3:19
04 Falling In Love Again 2:39
05 Icurok 4:24
06 Rubberband Lazer 4:20
07 Wayward Sisters 1:43
08 Ding Dong 3:03
09 Three Wishes 3:18
10 Simple Man 4:17
11 Death 4:18
12 Return 2:07

Klaus Nomi - Simple Man   (ogg  96mb)

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Klaus Nomi - In Concert (flac 202mb)

01 Intro Keys Of Life 1:32
02 Keys Of Life 3:52
03 Falling In Love Again 2:47
04 Lightning Strikes 1:40
05 Nomi Song 3:12
06 The Twist 3:20
07 Total Eclipse 4:42
08 I Feel Love 5:25
09 Samson And Delilah : Aria 5:46

Klaus Nomi - In Concert   (ogg  78mb)

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The existence of a third Klaus Nomi album must have seemed like an impossible dream for hardcore Nomi freaks for many years, but the brief Za Bakdaz -- a combination archival release, some new (musical) recording and art statement -- proves otherwise. Though the liner notes don't spell it out, the songs come from a series of sessions recorded with the singer by Nomi sidemen and collaborators George Elliott and Page Wood during 1979, while details of the stage presentation called the Nomi Show were still being put together. Described by Wood in an interview as reflective of Nomi's fascination with the "whole grand-opera-meets-Buck-Rogers thing," it's an intentionally polished and presented final product worked on by Elliott and Wood in recent years, and while some songs had surfaced elsewhere -- the mesmerizing title track and a concluding take on "Silent Night," not to mention an early and very different sounding rough version of Simple Man's "Rubberband Laser" -- the whole is an otherwise new and wonderfully loopy listen. The air throughout is of random play, heightened by the bubbly harpsichord-meets-lounge instrumental intro "High Wire," with a very self-consciously artistic edge -- instead of the immediate pop hooks of songs like his cover of "Lightning Strikes," here Nomi mostly explores arias in miniature, with further treatments like the chop-ups on "Cre Spoda" giving his voice an even more distant, unearthly feeling. That Nomi would sound in fine voice is unsurprising -- it was the power of his singing that won over people to start with as much as his image -- and compared to the often too-slick performances on his official studio albums, the accompaniment here explores odd textures, echoed riffs, and other odd sonic murk. Hearing Nomi's famous falsetto first glide in with a wordless cry on "Valentine's Day" is a wonderful moment, while such songs as the remarkable "Enchante," with everything from clattering industrial percussion to a haunting chorus, and the drone-funk of "Perne-A-Gyre" make for fine additions to a too-slim catalog.



Klaus Nomi - Za Bakdaz ( Unfinished Opera) (flac 183mb)

01 High Wire 2:04
02 Valentine's Day 2:49
03 Enchanté 4:31
04 Overture 2:42
05 Cre Spoda 3:03
06 Metronomi 2:44
07 Intermezzzo 1:16
08 Za Bakdaz (Live) 3:09
09 Perne-A-Gyre 2:56
10 Finale 2:34
11 Rubber Band Laser 2:21
12 Silent Night 1:38

    (ogg  )

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Oct 24, 2017

RhoDeo 1743 Roots

Hello, an extensive post today, no less then 8 albums by an an Argentine classical pianist, who is widely regarded as one of the greatest pianists of the second half of the 20th century.. Classical music they say it's good for the brain and here it's brought to you with plenty of soul aswell   ....N'Joy

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Argerich was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her paternal ancestors were Catalans based in Buenos Aires since the 18th century. Her maternal grandparents were Jewish immigrants from the Russian Empire, who settled in Colonia Villa Clara in the Entre Ríos province—one of the colonies established by Baron de Hirsch and the Jewish Colonization Association. The provenance of the name Argerich is Catalonia, Spain. She started playing the piano at age three. At the age of five, she moved to teacher Vincenzo Scaramuzza, who stressed to her the importance of lyricism and feeling. Argerich gave her debut concert in 1949 at the age of eight.

The family moved to Europe in 1955, where Argerich studied with Friedrich Gulda in Austria. Juan Perón, then the president of Argentina, made their decision possible by appointing her parents to diplomatic posts in the Argentine Embassy in Vienna. She later studied with Stefan Askenase and Maria Curcio. Argerich also seized opportunities for brief periods of coaching with Madeleine Lipatti (widow of Dinu Lipatti), Abbey Simon, and Nikita Magaloff. In 1957, at sixteen, she won both the Geneva International Music Competition and the Ferruccio Busoni International Competition within three weeks of each other. It was at the latter that she met Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, whom she would later seek out for lessons during a personal artistic crisis at the age of twenty, though she only had four lessons with him in a year and a half. Her greatest influence was Gulda, with whom she studied for 18 months.


Argerich performed her debut concert at the age of 8, playing Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor and Beethoven's First Piano Concerto in C major. Argerich rose to international prominence when she won the seventh International Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw in 1965, at age 24. In that same year, she debuted in the United States in Lincoln Center's Great Performers Series. In 1960, she had made her first commercial recording, which included works by Chopin, Brahms, Ravel, Prokofiev, and Liszt; it received critical acclaim upon its release in 1961. In 1967, she recorded Chopin's Polonaise, Op. 53.

Argerich has often remarked in interviews of feeling "lonely" on stage during solo performances. Since the
1980s, she has staged few solo performances, concentrating instead on concertos and, in particular,
chamber music, and collaborating with instrumentalists in sonatas. She is noted especially for her recordings of 20th-century works by composers such as Rachmaninoff, Messiaen and Prokofiev. One notable compilation pairs Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 3 (recorded in December 1982 with the Radio Symphonie-Orchester Berlin under the direction of Riccardo Chailly) with Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 (February 1980, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Kirill Kondrashin).Argerich is also famous for her interpretation of Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3, Ravel's Piano Concerto in G, and Bach's Partita No. 2 in C minor, which she has recorded several times and continues to perform.

Argerich has also promoted younger pianists, both through her annual festival and through her appearances as a member of the jury at international competitions. The pianist Ivo Pogorelić was thrust into the musical spotlight partly as a result of Argerich's actions: after he was eliminated in the third round of the 1980 International Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw, Argerich proclaimed him a "genius" and left the jury in protest. She has supported several artists including Gabriela Montero, Mauricio Vallina, Sergio Tiempo, Gabriele Baldocci, Christopher Falzone and others.

Argerich is president of the International Piano Academy Lake Como and performs each year at the Lugano Festival. She also created and has been General Director of the Argerich Music Festival and Encounter in Beppu, Japan, since 1996. Argerich during a concert given in the Néstor Kirchner Cultural Centre, July 2015. Her aversion to the press and publicity has resulted in her remaining out of the limelight for most of her career. Nevertheless, she is widely recognized as one of the greatest pianists of her time.

Her performance of Liszt's First Piano Concerto conducted by Daniel Barenboim at The Proms 2016 prompted this review in The Guardian: "It was an unforgettable performance. Argerich celebrated her 75th birthday in June this year, but that news doesn’t seem to have reached her fingers. Her playing is still as dazzling, as frighteningly precise, as it has always been; her ability to spin gossamer threads of melody as matchless as ever. This was unmistakably and unashamedly Liszt in the grand manner, a bit old-fashioned and sometimes even a bit vulgar at times, but in this of all concertos, with Barenboim and the orchestra following each twist and turn, every little quickening and moment of expressive reflection, it seemed entirely appropriate."

Argerich has been married three times. Her first marriage, to composer-conductor Robert Chen and with whom she had a daughter, violist Lyda Chen-Argerich, ended in 1964. From 1969 to 1973, Argerich was married to Swiss conductor Charles Dutoit, with whom she had a daughter, Annie Dutoit. Argerich continues to record and perform with Dutoit. In the 1970s she was also briefly married to pianist Stephen Kovacevich, with whom she has a daughter, Stéphanie.

In 1990, Argerich was diagnosed with malignant melanoma. After treatment, the cancer went into remission, but there was a recurrence in 1995, eventually metastasizing to her lungs and lymph nodes. Following an experimental treatment at the John Wayne cancer institute in Santa Monica pioneered by oncologist Donald Morton, Argerich's cancer went into remission again. In gratitude, Argerich performed a Carnegie Hall recital benefiting the Institute. As of 2017, Argerich remains cancer-free.

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If you don't already know these eight discs by Argentinean pianist Martha Argerich, you owe it to yourself to stop whatever you're doing and hear them because by common consent they represent a peak of postwar pianism. Argerich's technique knows no limits, and her personality as captured here knows no restraint. Thankfully these qualities are matched by Argerich's excellent taste, which prohibits her from lapsing into bathos or bombast. True, her Bach is extremely expressive, her Schumann wildly passionate, and her Liszt nearly explosive, but those qualities never topple from the razor's edge of balance or give in to self-aggrandizement. Whatever she brings out of the scores is intrinsic to the music, and there's nothing in her performances, no matter how extravagant or flamboyant, which cannot be justified. If you don't already know these recordings, try her 1960 reading of Prokofiev's Toccata and her 1975 account of Chopin's C sharp minor Prélude, Op. 45: the former's relentless drive and demonic energy are as overwhelmingly exciting as the latter's sustained phrasing and lyrical melancholy achieve an emotional summit. From 1960 to 1984 and from stereo to digital, Deutsche Grammophon's sound is as good as recorded sound gets: clear, clean, quiet, and immediate.



Martha Argerich - The Collection 01+02   (flac  398mb)

cd 1 Martha Argerich • Piano / Chopin • Brahms • Liszt • Ravel • Prokofieff

101 Scherzo No. 3 In C Sharp Minor, Op. 39 (Presto Con Fuoco) 6:30
Rhapsodies Op. 79
102 No. 1 In B Minor (Agitato) 8:27
103 No. 2 In G Minor (Molto Passionato, Ma Non Troppo Allegro) 6:30
104 Toccata Op. 11 4:07
105 Jeux D'eau (Très Doux) 5:25
106 Barcarolle In F Sharp Minor, Op. 60 (Allegretto) 8:07
107 Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6 (Tempo Giusto - Presto - Andante - Allegro - Presto) 6:21

cd 2 Martha Argerich • Frédéric Chopin



Piano Sonata No. 3 In B Minor, Op. 50 (21:55)
201 1. Allegro Maestoso 10:55
202 2. Scherzo: Molto Vivace 2:17
203 3. Largo 8:45
204 4. Presto Ma Non Tanto 4:24
205 Polonaise-Fantasie In A Flat Major, Op. 61 (Allegro Maestoso) 11:30
206 Polonaise No. 6 In A Flat Major, Op. 53 (Maestoso) 6:17
3 Mazurkas Op. 59
207 No. 1 In A Minor (Moderato) 3:18
208 No. 2 In A Flat Major (Allegretto) 2:18
209 No. 3 In F Sharp Minor (Vivace) 2:47

Martha Argerich - The Collection 01+02 (ogg  206mb)

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Argerich's legendary DG performance [of the Liszt Sonata] from 1972...suggests an entirely different level of both technical and musical achievement. Her prodigious fluency unites with a trail-blazing temperament, and Valhalla itself never ignited to such effect as at the central Andante's central climax. Both here and in the final Prestissimo there are reminders that Argerich has always played octaves like single notes, displaying a technique that few if any could equal. As I said when first commenting on this disc in my history of the Sonata, 'there are times when she becomes virtually engulfed in her own virtuosity' yet 'this is a performance to make other pianists turn pale and ask, how is it possible to play like this?'... Argerich's Schumann, too, is among her most meteoric, headlong flights. In terms of sheer brilliance she leaves all others standing yet, amazingly, still allows us fleeting glimpses of Eusebius (the poetic dreamer in Schumann, and one of his most dearly cherished fictions). The Brahms and Liszt Rhapsodies, taken from Argerich's very first 1963 DG disc, are among the most incandescent yet refined on record..."



Martha Argerich - The Collection 03+04 (flac  345mb)

cd 3: Liszt: Sonate H-Moll (In B Minor) • Schumann: Sonate G-Moll (In G Minor) • Martha Argerich
Piano Sonata In B Minor (25:48)
301 Lento Assai — Allegro Energico 3:03
302 Grandioso 1:59
303 Cantando Espressivo 3:40
304 Pesante — Recitativo 2:05
305 Andante Sostenuto 0:46
306 Quasi Adagio 4:49
307 Allegro Energico 2:13
308 Più Mosso 1:52
309 Cantando Espressivo Sensa Slentare 1:14
310 Stretta Quasi Presto — Presto — Prestissimo 1:13
311 Andante Sostenuto — Allegro Moderato  Op. 22 (16:47)
312 1. So Rasch Wie Möglich 5:34
313 2. Andantino. Getragen 4:58
314 3. Scherzo: Sehr Rasch Un Markiert — Attacca 1:31
315 4. Rondo: Presto — Prestissimo, Quasi Cadenza 4:44

cd 4: Frédéric Chopin: Sonate B-Moll (In B Flat Minor), Scherzo B-Moll (In B Minor), Andante Spianato Et Grande Polonaise



Piano Sonata No. 2 In B Flat Minor, Op. 35 (22:46)
401 1. Grave — Doppio Movimento 6:42
402 2. Scherzo 6:04
403 3. Marche Funébre: Lento 8:34
404 4. Finale: Presto 1:28
405 Grande Polonaise Brillante Précédée D'un Andante Spianato, Op. 22 13:26
406 Scherzo No. 2 In B Flat Mnor, Op. 31 (Presto) 8:55

Martha Argerich - The Collection 03+04 (ogg  180mb)

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Martha Argerich's mercurial playing, in which extremes of speed, clarity, and color are often combined to an almost unprecedented degree, is admittedly not to everyone's taste—though it usually is to mine... Chopin's Prelude, op. 45, is as perfectly poised and beautifully sung as you are likely to hear on records; and the Preludes, op. 28, contain many amazing moments (Nos. 16 and 24, above all!)... The Scherzo No. 2 and Polonaise-fantasie are magnificently interpreted throughout, and her magical way with the mazurkas will surely win over those who might think that Argerich is simply a pianist's pianist. Highest recommendation."



Martha Argerich - The Collection 05+06     (flac  288mb)

cd 5 Maurice Ravel: Gaspard De La Nuite, Sonatine, Valses Nobles Et Sentimentales • Martha Argerich
Gaspard De La Nuit (3 Poémes Pour Piano D'Aprés Aloysius Bertrand)

Gaspard De La Nuit (3 Poémes Pour Piano D'Aprés Aloysius Bertrand) (22:18)
501 Ondine 6:21
502 Le Gibet 6:42
503 Scarbo 9:18
Sonatine (10:37)
504 1. Modéré 4:00
505 2. Mouvement De Menuet 3:00
506 3. Animé 3:37
Valses Nobles Et Sentimentales
507 1. Modéré — Très Franc 1:20
508 2. Assez Lent — Avec Une Expression Intense 2:22
509 3. Modéré 1:23
510 4. Asses Animé 1:05
511 5. Presque Lent — Dans Un Sentiment Intime 1:34
512 6. Vif 0:41
513 7. Moins Vif 2:40
514 8. Epilogue: Lent 4:30

cd 6 Frédéric Chopin • 24 Préludes Op. 28, Préludes: Nr. 25 Op. 45, Nr. 26 Op. Posth. • Martha Argerich



24 Préludes Op. 28
601 No. 1 In C Major (Agitato) 0:32
602 No. 2 In A Minor (Lento) 2:05
603 No. 3 In G Major (Vivace) 0:51
604 No. 4 In E Minor (Largo) 1:51
605 No. 5 In D Major (Allegro Molto) 0:30
606 No. 6 In B Minor (Lento Assai) 1:46
607 No. 7 In A Major (Andantino) 0:44
608 No. 8 In F Sharp Minor (Molto Agitato) 1:29
609 No. 9 In E Major (Largo) 1:30
610 No. 10 In C Sharp Minor (Allegro Molto) 0:25
611 No. 11 In B Major (Vivace) 0:33
612 No. 12 In G Sharp Minor (Presto) 0:58
613 No. 13 In F Sharp Major (Lento)2:44
614 No. 14 In E Flat Minor (Allegro) 0:29
615 No. 15 In D Flat Major (Sostenuto) 4:51
616 No. 16 In B Flat Minor (Presto Con Fuoco) 0:58
617 No. 17 In A Flat Major (Allegretto) 2:50
618 No. 18 In F Minor (Allegro Molto) 0:47
619 No. 19 In E Flat Major (Vivace) 1:04
620 No. 20 In C Minor (Largo) 1:32
621 No. 21 In B Flat Major (Cantabile) 1:34
622 No. 22 In G Minor (Molto Agitato) 0:34
623 No. 23 In F Major (Moderato) 0:43
624 No. 24 In D Minor (Allegro Appassionato) 2:14
625 Prélude In C Sharp Minor, Op 45 (Sostenuto) 4:03
626 Prélude In A Flat Major, Op. Posth. (Presto Con Leggierezza) 0:41

Martha Argerich - The Collection 05+06 (ogg  175mb )

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Argerich's playing of Bach is a thing of beauty. It is also a model of unusually pure piano-playing, with very little pedal and only occasional ‘agogics’ – the small delays which draw attention to a structural landmark. Argerich achieves character with great discipline, by varying her touch, by balancing sounds immaculately against each other, and by her irresistible sense of rhythm, so important in the dance movements of the Partita and Suite. Her buoyancy and alertness in the lively movements are almost alarming. And who else would dare make the Sarabande in the Partita so simple? You’ll feel years younger after listening.



Martha Argerich - The Collection 07+08 (flac  374mb)

cd 7 Johann Sebastian Bach: Toccata BWV 911, Partiata BWV 826, Englische Suite No. 2 BWV 807 • Martha Argerich
701 Toccata In C Minor, BWV 911 10:56
Partita No. 2 In C Minor, BWV 826 (18:56)
702 Sinfonia 4:16
703 Allemande 4:18
704 Courante 2:08
705 Sarabande 3:54
706 Rondeau 1:17
707 Capriccio 3:03
English Suite No. 2 In A Major, BWV 807 (20:09)
708 Prélude 4:18
709 Allemande 2:56
710 Courante 1:32
711 Sarabande 4:09
712 Bourée I/II 3:54
713 Gigue 3:20

cd 8 Robert Schumann: • Kinderszenen • Kreisleriana • Martha Argerich



Kinderszenen Op. 15 (18:44)
801 1. Von Fremden Ländern Und Menschen 1:52
802 2. Kuriose Geschichte 1:04
803 3. Haschemann 0:28
804 4. Bittendes Kind 0:59
805 5. Glückes Genug 1:03
806 6. Wichtige Begebenheit 0:48
807 7. Träumerei 2:55
808 8. Am Kamin 0:51
809 9. Ritter Vom Steckenpferd 0:35
810 10. Fast Zu Ernst 2:00
811 11. Fürchtenmachen 1:33
812 12. Kind Im Einschlummern 2:23
813 13. Der Dichter Spricht 2:14

Kreisleriana Op. 16 (33:35)
814 1. Äußerst Bewegt. Agitatissimo 2:26
815 2. Sehr Innig Und Nicht Zu Rasch. Con Molta Espressione, Non Troppo Presto 9:40
816 3. Serh Aufgeregt. Molto Agitato 4:32
817 4. Sehr Langsam. Lento Assai 3:54
818 5. Sehr Lebhaft. Vivace Assai 3:08
819 6. Sehr Langsam. Lento Assai 4:11
820 7. Sehr Rasch. Molto Presto 2:06
821 8. Schnell Und Spielend. Vivace E Scherzando 3:29

Martha Argerich - The Collection 07+08 (ogg  192mb)

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Oct 23, 2017

RhjoDeo 1743 Mars 07

Hello, well as expected Hamilton won, luckily there was plenty action elsewhere, Verstappen started 16th and by the time he got to 6 th he last too much time to trouble Hamilton a brillant overtake to overtake Raikonen saw him finish 3rd only to have officials denounce his overtake as illegal-it was a Ferrari after all, anyway other drivers had made that move and didnt get penalized-Raikonen didn't protest either, it looks Max isn't too popular with old men of the FIA.  Bottas sizzled back to 5th after being overtaken by Vettel, Raikonen and Verstappen. Ricciardo's car gave the ghost as did Alonso's (once again). Sainz came in 7th in his first race in the new Renault.



Today's artist was an American author and screenwriter. He worked in a variety of genres, including fantasy, science fiction, horror and mystery fiction. Widely known for his dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953), and his science fiction and horror story collections The Martian Chronicles (1950), The Illustrated Man (1951), and I Sing the Body Electric (1969), our man was one of the most celebrated 20th- and 21st-century American writers. While most of his best known work is in speculative fiction, he also wrote in other genres, such as the coming-of-age novel Dandelion Wine (1957) or the fictionalized memoir Green Shadows, White Whale (1992).

Recipient of numerous awards, including a 2007 Pulitzer Citation, Bradbury also wrote and consulted on screenplays and television scripts, many of his works were adapted to comic book, television and film formats. On his death in 2012, The New York Times called Bradbury "the writer most responsible for bringing modern science fiction into the literary mainstream.... N'joy.

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The Ray Bradbury Theater is an anthology series that ran for two seasons on HBO, three episodes per season from 1985 to 1986, and four additional seasons on USA Network from 1988 to 1992. It was later shown in reruns on the Sci Fi Channel. All 65 episodes were written by Ray Bradbury and many were based on short stories or novels he had written, including "A Sound of Thunder", "Marionettes, Inc.", "Banshee", "The Playground", "Mars is Heaven", "Usher II", "The Jar", "The Long Rain", "The Veldt", "The Small Assassin", "The Pedestrian", "The Fruit at the Bottom of the Bowl", "Here There Be Tygers", "The Toynbee Convector", and "Sun and Shadow".

Many of the episodes focused on only one of Bradbury's original works. However, Bradbury occasionally included elements from his other works. "Marionettes, Inc." featured Fantoccini, a character from "I Sing the Body Electric!". "Gotcha!" included an opening sequence taken from "The Laurel and Hardy Love Affair". Characters were renamed, and elements added to the original works to expand the story to 23–28 minutes or to better suit the television medium.

Each episode would begin with a shot of Bradbury in his office, gazing over mementos of his life, which he states (in narrative) are used to spark ideas for stories. During the first season, Bradbury sometimes appeared on-screen in brief vignettes introducing the story. During the second season, Bradbury provided the opening narration with no specific embellishment concerning the episode. During the third season, a foreshortened version of the narration was used and Bradbury would add specific comments relevant to the episode presented. During the fourth and later seasons, a slightly shorter generic narration was used with no additional comments.

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The Ray Bradbury Theater 18 And So Died Riabouchinska (avi  294mb)

A ventriloquist is implicated in the murder of a man at a theater.



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The people of Earth are preparing for war—a war that could potentially destroy the planet. Explorers are sent to Mars to find a new place for humans to colonize. Bradbury's Mars is a place of hope, dreams, and metaphor—of crystal pillars and fossil seas—where a fine dust settles on the great empty cities of a silently destroyed civilization. It is here the invaders have come to despoil and commercialize, to grow and to learn—first a trickle, then a torrent, rushing from a world with no future toward a promise of tomorrow. The Earthman conquers Mars...and then is conquered by it, lulled by dangerous lies of comfort and familiarity, and enchanted by the lingering glamour of an ancient, mysterious native race.

Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles is presented here as a full cast audio production with an original music score and thousands of sound effects by the award winning Colonial Radio Theatre on the Air. It marks their fourth collaboration with one of the most celebrated fiction writers of our time—Ray Bradbury.



Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 07 (mp3  26mb)

07 The Martian Chronicles 30:58



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previously

Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 01 (mp3  22mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 02 (mp3  22mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 03 (mp3  20mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 04 (mp3  22mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 05 (mp3  21mb)
Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 06 (mp3  21mb)

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Oct 22, 2017

Sundaze 1743

Hello, The F1 circus is in Austin Texas this weekend on a great designed race track, it is Hamilton who was fastest, once again a pole for him. Verstappen was faster then Vettel until the final corner when he lost full control and ended up 6th with a 15 place grid penalty his will be a race of overtaking if he gets beyond the first lap unscaved. Vettel 2nd then and the start will be interesting. Behind Bottas, Ricciardo and Raikonen will gard their teams interest.



Vidna Obmana is a pseudonym used by Belgian composer and ambient musician Dirk Serries. The name Vidna Obmana, a phrase in Serbian, literally translates to "optical illusion" and was chosen by Serries because he felt it accurately described the music. Obmana's music has often been characterized as anamorphic and organic. He uses the techniques of looping and shaping harmonies, minimizing the configurations to a few notes.....N'Joy

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Belgian producer Dirk Serries, aka Vidna Obmana, is a prolific composer of deep ambient and electro-acoustic music, utilizing slow, shifting electronic figures and sparse environmental recordings to construct long, minimalist, often extremely personal textural works. Taking his nom de plume from the Yugoslavian for "optical illusion" (a concept which carries much weight in his composing, as well), Serries has released material through a wide range of different labels, including Projekt, Amplexus, Extreme, Hic Sunt Leones, Syrenia, ND, and Multimood. Born and raised in Antwerp, Serries began recording experimental noise musics in the late '80s, working solo and in combination with artists such as PBK, exploring the more abrasive side of electronic composition. Beginning with the release in 1990 of Shadowing in Sorrow, however, (the first part of what would come to be known as Vidna's ambient Trilogy) Serries began moving toward an almost isolationist ambient aesthetic, exploring themes of calm, solitude, grief, and introspection in long, moving pieces which tended to chart similar ground as American space music artists such as Robert Rich, Michael Stearns, and Steve Roach (Serries has since collaborated with both Rich and Roach). The first two movements of the Trilogy -- Sorrow, as well as its follow-up Passage in Beauty -- were self-released by Serries in 1990 and 1991, with the third volume, Ending Mirag, appearing the following year on the American ND label. The album was praised as some of the finest post-classical experimental electronic music of its time, and the Stateside connection finally opened his music up to an American audience, leading also to his association with Sam Rosenthal's Projekt label (the entire Trilogy was finally reissued by Projekt sister label Relic as a boxed set in 1996, with several new Vidna releases also appearing in the interim).

Although his textural recordings form the core of his output to date, Serries' more recent solo and collaborative works (such as The Transcending Quest, Echoing Delight, and The Spiritual Bonding) have also found him pushing the minimalism of his earlier works into the Fourth World territories of artists such as Jorge Reyes, Michael Stearns, and Jon Hassell, setting lush, dreamy soundscapes in a larger, more engaging rhythmic framework (usually with contributions from percussionists Djen Ajakan Shean and Steve Roach). Still, as many compilations and retrospectives of his earlier or unreleased work have appeared in recent times so as to confuse somewhat the trajectory of his development, which at any rate seems to trade more or less equally between the freeform conceptual landscapes of his earlier Projekt, Relic, and ND works and the more structured interactivity of the Extreme and Amplexus releases. Collaborations have also increasingly occupied Serries' time, with full-length works with Steve Roach (Well of Souls, The Spiritual Bonding), Robert Rich (The Spiritual Bonding), Asmus Tietchens (a self-titled collaboration for Syrenia), Sam Rosenthal (Terrace Of Memories), and Djen Ajakan Shean (Parallel Flaming) appearing all within the space of only a few years. Both Landscape in Obscurity and The Shape of Solitude followed in 1999, and in the spring of 2000 Obmana returned with Echo Passage and Surreal Sanctuary. Subterranean Collective was issued the following year.

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A master of techno tribal rhythms and dense harmonic soundscapes, Vidna Obmana has crafted all kinds of works. With his 2001 release, Tremor, Vidna Obmana has crafted a series of 11 dense and rhythmically charged musical tapestries. Fans will be glad that this isn't much of a departure from his previous works, but, at the same time, this really speaks well of his work as an artist. The great thing about Vidna Obmana's work is that, no matter what kind is being done, it always sounds like his own. With Tremor, he explores more of the dark and moody side, but it doesn't deviate too far away from his normal sound, which is great because it remains representative of Vidna Obmana's work while at the same time being new and fresh. Tremor is an excellent recording that can be enjoyed by longtime fans and those that are unfamiliar alike. As well, this Release recording is a recommended starting point for anybody not familiar with Vidna Obmana.



Vidna Obmana - Tremor (flac 334mb)

01 Moedra 4:28
02 Flesh Reaper 7:30
03 MindTunnel 6:55
04 The Insane Brightness 5:33
05 Luminous Progression 7:31
06 Artificial Repose 7:15
07 The Seeker And The Spell 7:24
08 Simulate 8:10
09 Tremor 8:10
10 The Bleak Inferno 3:06
11 Descent 7:00

Vidna Obmana - Tremor  (ogg 186mb)

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There are some e-music collaborations that are just meant to be. The collaboration between Vidna Obmana and Brannan Lane is such a collaboration. Deep Unknown is a set of foggy tribal expansive atmospheres. Brannan’s space minimalism and Vidna’s electro-tribal soundworlds blend smoothly and neatly into a somber, almost destitute soundscape. Deep Unknown is a set of foggy tribal expansive atmospheres. Brannan's space minimalism and Dirk's electro-tribal soundworlds blend smoothly and neatly into a somber, almost destitute soundscape. This album is about isolation and the limited benefits of that emotional defense mechanism. The benefits are the perceptions of freedom, self-importance and egotistical introspection. The dangers of isolation are clear. The biggest danger is listening to one's own interpretation of the inner self. So the low-key soundscape plays to the angst of isolation too. These expert sound designers have built a massive soundworld for isolation.



Vidna Obmana & Brannan Lane - Deep Unknown (flac  380mb)

01 Unfamiliar Territory 8:38
02 Dark Decent 10:47
03 Points Of Light 1 8:04
04 Points Of Light 2 6:57
05 Deep Unknown 1 10:22
06 Deep Unknown 2 10:45
07 Deep Unknown 3 12:52

Vidna Obmana & Brannan Lane - Deep Unknown  (ogg  165mb)

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Spore is the second disc in Vidna Obmana's (Dirk Serries) trilogy based on Dante's Inferno. This is also quite a departure for Serries. He uses quite an array of eclectic devices to create this experimental -- almost avant-garde -- album. The most interesting sounds are from the overtone flutes and fujaras. Serries has commented that this is not an ambient album. That is correct. This album is interesting enough to be the focus of deep listening. It is not innocuous enough to be ignored as background music. It demands attention. The rhythms and atmospheres complement each other smoothly. The experimental sounds are neither dominant nor dominated. This disc is certainly electronic, definitely experimental, and decidedly Vidna Obmana.



Vidna Obmana - Spore (flac  493mb)

01 Through The Collective Pain 3:37
02 The Humanity Underneath 7:25
03 Skin Strip 8:46
04 Duality Of Passion 5:38
05 Beyond The Shaman 5:57
06 The Nihilist 7:48
07 Creep - Isolation Trip 11:12
08 Spore 5:35
09 Resonant Gore 17:38
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Vidna Obmana - Spore  (ogg  188mb)

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When an album clocks in at close to 75 minutes and is a mere eight songs, one gets the impression that the artist is in no hurry to make his mark. But this album is the final part of the musician's "Dante Trilogy" so it does seem logical to be so epic. Vidna Obmana begins this odyssey with "Canto," which is more in line with a dark country dirge that David Allan Coe might have performed in his heyday. The album shifts gears with an industrial-meets-ambient "Bloodshift," something Trent Reznor might pull off but few others. Dark and mysterious, Vidna Obmana lets the almost hypnotic groove settle in before adding layers of subtle yet important noise. The song comes down near the homestretch, bringing to mind brief moments of Pink Floyd's "Echoes." The ensuing "Torment and Resolution" evolves a bit quicker and creates instant tension as sounds roll over each other above a drumbeat that slowly creeps in. But unlike the previous song, there is initially something bubbling under the surface that never breaks through. Unfortunately, it results in more atmosphere than substance, resembling "Frankie's House" by Jeff Beck at times. "Sinner's Tongue" is more electro-centric in the early portions, recalling the start of perhaps a great Depeche Mode or Moby number. The centerpiece is the lengthy "The Virtual Insomnia," a 13-minute song which starts off promising as the electro-ambient tone gives way to a dominant percussion. Unfortunately it takes much too long to get off the ground and comes across as a spoiled or missed opportunity. It tends to take off around the nine-minute mark like a Radiohead instrumental, but it's too little too late. "Impious Rising" tends to stand out more for its grander, fuller sound with Vidna Obmana getting to the point far quicker than on other songs. It works thanks to its orchestral touch, not just relying on textures and haunting noises. The title track seems fitting and is the first noticeable bit of guitar, something that is sorely lacking overall. It's a decent album but only for die-hard dark ambient fans.



Vidna Obmana - Legacy  (flac 460mb)

01 Canto 2:45
02 Bloodshift 7:05
03 Torment And Resolution 11:56
04 Sinner's Tongue 7:33
05 The Virtual Insomnia 13:06
06 Cycle Of Agony 8:55
07 Impious Rising 11:43
08 Legacy 10:54

 Vidna Obmana - Legacy   (ogg  178mb )

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