Jan 19, 2018

RhoDeo 1802 Grooves

Hello,

Todays Artist was accurately dubbed "the Queen of Chicago blues" (and sometimes just the blues in general), she helped keep the tradition of big-voiced, brassy female blues belters alive, recasting the spirits of early legends like Bessie Smith, Ma Rainey, Big Mama Thornton, and Memphis Minnie for the modern age. Her rough, raw vocals were perfect for the swaggering new electrified era of the blues, and her massive hit "Wang Dang Doodle" served notice that male dominance in the blues wasn't as exclusive as it seemed. After a productive initial stint on Chess, she spent several decades on the prominent contemporary blues label Alligator, going on to win more W.C. Handy Awards than any other female performer in history, and establishing herself as far and away the greatest female blues singer of her time. . ........ N'joy

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Koko was born Cora Walton on September 28, 1928, on a sharecropper's farm in Memphis, TN. Her mother died in 1939, and she and her siblings grew up helping their father in the fields; she got the nickname "Koko" because of her love of chocolate. Koko began singing gospel music in a local Baptist church; inspired by the music they heard on the radio, she and her siblings also played blues on makeshift instruments. In 1953, Koko married truck driver Robert "Pops" Taylor and moved with him to Chicago to look for work; settling on the South Side, Pops worked in a slaughterhouse and Koko got a job as a housemaid. The Taylors often played blues songs together at night, and frequented the bustling South Side blues clubs whenever they could; Pops encouraged Koko to sit in with some of the bands, and her singing -- which reflected not only the classic female blues shouters, but contemporaries Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf -- quickly made a name for her. In 1962, Taylor met legendary Chess Records songwriter/producer/bassist Willie Dixon, who was so impressed with her live performance that he took her under his wing. He produced her 1963 debut single, "Honky Tonky," for the small USA label, then secured her a recording contract with Chess.

Taylor made her recording debut for Chess in 1964 and hit it big the following year with the Dixon-penned "Wang Dang Doodle," which sold over a million copies and hit number four on the R&B charts. It became her signature song forever after, and it was also the last Chess single to hit the R&B Top Ten. Demand for Taylor's live act skyrocketed, even though none of her follow-ups sold as well, and as the blues audience began to shift from black to white, the relatively new Taylor became one of the first Chicago blues artists to command a following on the city's white-dominated North Side. Eventually, she and her husband were able to quit their day jobs, and he served as her manager; she also put together a backing band called the Blues Machine. With the release of two albums -- 1969's Koko Taylor, which featured a number of her previous singles; and 1972's Basic Soul -- Taylor's live gigs kept branching out further and further from Chicago, and when she played the 1972 Ann Arbor Blues and Jazz Festival, the resulting live album on Atlantic helped bring her to a more national audience.

By the early '70s, Chess Records was floundering financially, and eventually went under in 1975. Taylor signed with a then-young Chicago-based label called Alligator, which grew into one of America's most prominent blues labels over the years. Taylor debuted for Alligator in 1975 with I Got What It Takes, an acclaimed effort that garnered her first Grammy nomination. Her 1978 follow-up, The Earthshaker, featured several tunes that became staples of her live show, including "I'm a Woman" and "Hey Bartender," and her popularity on the blues circuit just kept growing in spite of the music's commercial decline. In 1980, she won the first of an incredible string of W.C. Handy Awards (for Best Contemporary Female Artist), and over the next two decades, she would capture at least one more almost every year (save for 1989, 1997, and 1998). 1981 brought From the Heart of a Woman, and in 1984, Taylor won her first Grammy thanks to her appearance on Atlantic's various-artists compilation Blues Explosion, which was named Best Traditional Blues Album. She followed that success with the guest-laden Queen of the Blues in 1985, which won her a couple extra Handy Awards for Vocalist of the Year and Entertainer of the Year (no "female" qualifier attached). In 1987, she released her first domestic live album, Live in Chicago: An Audience With the Queen.

Tragedy struck in 1988. Taylor broke her shoulder, collarbone, and several ribs in a van accident while on tour, and her husband went into cardiac arrest; although Pops survived for the time being, his health was never the same, and he passed away some months later. After recuperating, Taylor made a comeback at the annual Chicago Blues Festival, and in 1990 she issued Jump for Joy, as well as making a cameo appearance in the typically bizarre David Lynch film Wild at Heart. Taylor followed it in 1993 with the aptly titled Force of Nature, after which she took a seven-year hiatus from recording; during that time, she remarried and continued to tour extensively, maintaining the stature she'd achieved with her '80s work as the living Queen of the Blues. In 2000, she finally returned with a new album, Royal Blue, which featured a plethora of guest stars: B.B. King, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Johnnie Johnson, and Keb' Mo'. Health issues forced another seven-year hiatus before she returned with the album Old School in 2007. Koko Taylor died in Chicago in June 2009 after experiencing complications from surgery for gastrointestinal bleeding. She was 80 years old.

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A solid contemporary blues album that ranges from Koko Taylor's own "Spellbound" and "Put the Pot On," a rendition of Toussaint McCall's tender soul lament "Nothing Takes the Place of You," and a saucy revival of the old Ike & Tina Turner R&B gem "If I Can't Be First." Gene Barge once again penned the horn charts, Carey Bell contributes his usual harp mastery to Taylor's remake of Little Milton's "Mother Nature," and only Buddy Guy's over-the-top guitar histrionics on "Born Under a Bad Sign" grate. Long may the queen reign!



Koko Taylor - Force Of Nature    (flac  397mb)

01 Mother Nature 4:41
02 If I Can't Be First 3:40
03 Hound Dog 5:33
04 Born Under A Bad Sign 6:22
05 Let The Juke Joint Jump 6:08
06 63 Year Old Mama 4:29
07 Don't Put Your Hands On Me 2:53
08 Bad Case Of Loving You 4:23
09 Fish In Dirty Water 5:45
10 Tit For Tat 4:31
11 Put The Pot On 3:48
12 Nothing Takes The Place Of You 4:41
13 Spellbound 4:07
14 Greedy Man 3:27

Koko Taylor - Force Of Nature  (ogg  142mb)

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Koko Taylor left Chess Records in 1973, as the company was heading towards its demise, and joined up with Bruce Iglauer's brand-new company Alligator Records in 1975. She has remained there ever since, but between her leaving Chess and her singning with Iglauer, Taylor recorded this little-known long player.

There are couple of old warhorses here, somewhat superflous re-recordings of a handful of Taylor's 1960s Chess singles, but there is also a lot of good stuff which you won't find anywhere else. Koko Taylor's own "What Kind Of Man Is This" makes it debut on this album, a grinding mid-tempo blues and one of her best original songs, and she does well by Lillian Offitt's "Wonder Why" and Jimmy Reed's "Big Boss Man" (which is mysteriously credited to Al Smith and Luther Dixon).

"Big Boss Man" would show up a year and a half later on her first Alligator album as well, however, as would "I Got What It Takes", so you might be asking yourself at this point: Why would I buy this?
Well, maybe you won't. But judged on its own merits this is a fine album, not least because of the excellent band. Koko Taylor is backed by the Aces (drummer Fred Below and brothers Lou and Dave Myers on guitar and bass), and by none other than Muddy Waters' former guitarist Jimmy Rogers and stylish pianist Willie Mabon, both of them frequent bandleaders themselves. Mabon's elegant playing is particularly delightful, and Taylor's voice is, of course, made to sing the blues.

An uncredited harpist shows up on "I Love A Lover Like You", by the way, or maybe it is one of the two guitarist performing that duty. Jimmy Rogers used to play the harp in the very first Muddy Waters Blues Band, and Louis Myers of the Aces could play it as well.

The last five songs were recorded live on December 1st, 1973, in Amstelveen in the Netherlands. Koko Taylor is backed by the same band that recorded the studio tracks with her. The 1973 studio rendition of "Twenty-Nine Ways" doesn't quite match Taylor's Willie Dixon-produced Chess version, mostly because of a more "ordinary" and less charming arrangement, but this live version is very nice, and Taylor also interprets Preston Foster's "Got My Mojo Working" during the live portion of the disc, and performs a six-minute rendition of her R&B hit single "Wang Dang Doodle". It is a bit of an oddity, "South Side Lady", but it's not half bad. Not at all.



Koko Taylor - South Side Lady   (flac 410mb)

01 I'm A Little Mixed Up 3:39
02 Wonder Why 3:20
03 What Kind Of Man Is This 4:53
04 Black Nights 3:56
05 Love Me To Death 4:08
06 I Got What It Takes 4:26
07 Big Boss Man 4:58
08 I'm Gonna Get Lucky 5:23
09 Twenty-Nine Ways 3:51
10 I Love A Lover Like You 2:47
11 Wonder Why II 4:54
12 Wang Dang Doodle 6:43
13 I Got What It Takes 5:32
14 Twenty-Nine Ways 4:51
15 I Got My Mojo Working 3:41

.Koko Taylor - South Side Lady  (ogg  168mb)

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Royal Blue is the first Alligator release from Koko Taylor since 1993's Grammy nominated Force of Nature. This is a mainly up-tempo set with excellent support from several guest appearances by B.B. King, Johnny Johnson, Ken Saydak, and Kenny Wayne Shepherd who contributes some scorching guitar on the Melissa Ethridge-penned hit "Bring Me Some Water." Taylor not only co-produced this release but wrote four of the 12 tracks, including the acoustic "The Man Next Door." On this track, the combination of Koko's passionate voice with Keb Mo's gritty Delta slide guitar makes you wish she would move further in this direction on future releases. Royal Blue proves Koko Taylor is still the undisputed queen of the blues.



Koko Taylor - Royal Blue    (flac 374mb)

01 Save Your Breath 4:11
02 Hittin' On Me 3:32
03 Bring Me 5:21
04 But On The Other Hand 4:43
05 Don't Let Me Catch You With Your Drawers Down 4:12
06 Blues Hotel 4:23
07 Fuel To Burn 3:51
08 The Man Next Door 5:15
09 Old Woman 4:31
10 Ernestine 5:04
11 Keep Your Booty Out Of My Bed 4:38
12 Keep Your Mouth Shut And Your Eyes Open 3:48

Koko Taylor - Royal Blue  (ogg  123mb )

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Between 1993 and 1997, Orbis Publishing released a partworks series entitled "The Blues Collection". The series comprised 90 fortnightly issues, each including a thin magazine-sized biography (each 12 pages long) and an album on CD or cassette tape.

To sum things up a remastered sampler containing early singles from Koko Taylor:
I Got What It Takes / What Kind of Man Is This (1964)
Don't Mess With the Messer / Whatever I Am You Made Me (1965)
Wang Dang Doodle / Blues Heaven (1966)
Good Advice / Tell Me The Truth (1966)
Fire / Insane Asylum (1967)
Egg or the Hen / Just Love Me (1967)
(I Got) All You Need / All Money Spent (On Feeling Good) ‎(1967 )
I Don't Care Who Knows / Separate or Integrate (1968)
and another song from 1965: I'm a Little Mixed Up
four tracks from the debut album Koko Taylor] (1969)



Koko Taylor - Wang Dang Doodle   (flac 270mb)

01 What Kind Of Man Is This? 3:03
02 Don't Mess With The Messer 2:44
03 I Got What It Takes 3:03
04 Whatever I Am, You Made Me 2:25
05 I'm A Little Mixed Up 2:39
06 Wang Dang Doddle 3:00
07 Blues Heaven 2:21
08 (I Got) All You Need 2:13
09 Good Advice 2:27
10 Egg Or The Hen 2:28
11 Just Love Me 2:41
12 Insane Asylum 4:20
13 Separate Or Integrate 3:07
14 I Don't Care Who Knows 2:10
15 Yes, It's Good For You 2:41
16 Twenty-Nine Ways 3:12
17 Nitty Gritty 2:41
18 I Love A Lover Like You 2:44

. Koko Taylor - Wang Dang Doodle  (ogg  116mb)

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Jan 17, 2018

RhoDeo 1802 Aetix

Hello,


Today's artists an English punk band, among the earliest in the first wave of British punk. Formed in 1976, the mainstay of the band has been vocalist Charlie Harper, originally a singer in Britain's R&B scene. They were also one of the first street punk bands. Their style combined the energy of punk and the rock and roll edge of the then thriving pub rock scene. The band had hit singles such as "Stranglehold", "Warhead", "Teenage", and "Tomorrow's Girls", with several of their songs managing to enter the United Kingdom's Top Forty.......N'Joy

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One of the most important bands of the second wave of U.K. punk, the U.K. Subs had been on the scene since the early days of British punk. But as the first wave of bands began to crumble, the U.K. Subs just got tougher and faster, and slowly rose to fame as many of their peers were burning out, finally breaking out in 1979. If anything has been the U.K. Subs' trademark, it's longevity; vocalist and founder Charlie Harper has kept the group alive for 40 years, and while more than 75 other people have gone in and out of the lineup over the years, he's kept the beery rabble-rousing spirit of the U.K. Subs alive and well on the road and in the studio.

Harper founded the U.K. Subs in 1976. He had previously been the lead singer with an R&B act called the Marauders (and held down a day job as a hair stylist), but after catching a show by the Damned, Harper decided punk rock was the future, and he formed a group called the Subversives. Harper teamed up with guitarist Nicky Garratt, bassist Steve Slack, and drummer Pete Davies to complete the first edition of the group, whose name was soon pared down to U.K. Subs. The band began making the rounds of the London club circuit, and earned the seal of approval from influential BBC disc jockey John Peel, who recorded two radio sessions with the band, one in 1977 and another in 1978. Despite their growing notoriety, it wasn't until 1979 that the group finally scored a record deal, with GEM Records signing the band and releasing their first studio album, Another Kind of Blues.

As many acts on the U.K. punk and new wave scene were either breaking up (the Sex Pistols, X-Ray Spex, Generation X) or going through creative transitions (the Clash, the Damned, Wire), the U.K. Subs proved there was still a lively audience for no-frills punk rock, and Another Kind of Blues became a surprise hit, rising to number 21 on the British charts. The group's second album, 1980's Brand New Age, fared even better, peaking at number 18, and a live set recorded at the Roxy in London in 1977 received a belated release from Stiff Records (without the band's input) as Live Kicks. The band responded by delivering an album drawn from more recorded live shows, 1980's Crash Course, which took the band to the Top Ten of the U.K. LP charts, making it to number eight. Their live attack was also documented in a short documentary by filmmaker Julien Temple, Punk Can Take It! The hard-working Subs introduced a third studio effort, Diminished Responsibility, in 1981, which became another chart success, reaching number 18 on the British listings.

By 1980, the band experienced its first major lineup change, when Davies fell ill and was replaced for a tour by Ian Tansley, and then by Steve Roberts. Davies would return and depart the U.K. Subs numerous times over the years, as would guitarist Nicky Garratt and bassist Paul Slack (as well as Slack's initial replacement, Alvin Gibbs). In 1982, the U.K. Subs jumped from GEM to NEMS Records, and their first album for the label, Endangered Species, didn't fare as well on the charts as their previous efforts. And while many British punk acts found indifferent audiences in the United States, the U.K. Subs' most successful albums were never even released in America until many years after the fact, though they staged their first North American tour in 1980.

However, none of this kept Charlie Harper down, and while the U.K. Subs' personnel would change on a regular basis from the mid-'80s onward (Lars Fredericksen of Rancid was briefly a member in the early '90s), the band continued to tour nonstop, playing in the U.K., Europe, and Japan on a regular basis, and occasionally making their way to the United States. Between studio efforts, live discs, and compilations of their back catalog, the band had literally dozens of albums to their credit when they issued 2016's Ziezo, which Harper declared would be the U.K. Subs' final studio album. However, Harper insisted that the band wasn't over despite that claim, and several months later, Friends and Relations appeared, which combined new music with rare archival material.

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The U.K. Subs' debut can easily stand alongside any other punk classics released during its heyday. Musically, the Subs are similar to the early Clash, but where the Clash spit out balls of fiery rage, the Subs leaven their bile with sardonic humor. "Tomorrow's Girls" imagines a futuristic Venus who "will be pre-programmed," and the music spits out a hilarious series of mock computer beeps. "Crash Course" promises staid executives that, just by listening to the Subs' music and buying up the right clothes, they, too, can "learn" punk rock. Only the sneeringly sexist "All I Wanna Know" hits a sour note. The music is rooted in the typical punk influences: the New York Dolls, the Velvet Underground, and early Who, but the band adds a twist of classic '60s British R&B groups like the Yardbirds. It's melodic, punchy, and fast, delivering the necessary bite without ever becoming too abrasive or sugary. Another Kind of Blues is an impressive debut from the classic punk era.



U.K. Subs - Another Kind Of Blues (flac  361mb)

01 C.I.D. 2:16
02 I Couldn't Be You 2:07
03 I Live In A Car 1:37
04 Tomorrows Girls 2:23
05 Killer 1:29
06 World War 1:22
07 Rockers 3:37
08 I.O.D. 1:24
09 T.V. Blues 2:08
10 Blues 1:52
11 Lady Esquire 1:58
12 All I Wanna Know 1:46
13 Crash Course 1:43
14 Young Criminals 2:20
15 B.I.C. 1:37
16 Disease 1:29
17 Stranglehold 1:58

U.K. Subs - Another Kind Of Blues   (ogg  115mb)

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'Endangered Species' was the UK Subs fourth studio album, and already their time of commercial success was coming to an end. The damage had been done by the weak and poorly produced third album 'Diminished Responsibility' and of course due to the fact that the first big phase of punk rock had been and gone. The above said, this is an absolutely brilliant album and I would describe the production as perfect. The sound is solid, rich and as full bloodied as any heavy rock album I have ever heard. More importantly, this album included some brilliant classic heavy rock music in for example 'Endangered Species', 'Living Dead' and 'Down On The Farm', and also features the UK Subs in surprisingly creative mood in tracks such as 'Flesh Wound' and 'Ice Age'. Also check out 'Ambition' which has some brilliant harmonica playing.



U.K. Subs - Endangered Species (flac 333mb)

01 Endangered Species 3:25
02 Living Dead 1:40
03 Countdown 4:58
04 Ambition 3:41
05 Fear Of Girls 2:13
06 Lie Down And Die 1:58
07 Down On The Farm 3:18
08 Sensitive Boys 4:10
09 ÷8 × 5 2:50
10 Ice Age 3:37
11 I Robot 2:55
12 1Flesh Wound 2:53

U.K. Subs - Endangered Species   (ogg  124mb)

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Compiling the last sessions recorded by the classic U.K. Subs lineup of Charlie Harper, Nicky Garratt, and Alvin Gibbs, A.W.O.L. sounds less like a patchwork recording than it should. Despite the presence of no less than three drummers, the album holds together because the band works as a cohesive unit. The tracks veer from the all-out fury of "Police State" to the darker, murkier "Enemy Awaits," displaying more growth in the band's songwriting skills. "Keep On Running" even incorporates new wave-style keyboards -- an unthinkable move on previous albums. Unfortunately, after these sessions, the band's classic lineup broke up, and afterward the U.K. Subs became little more than a collection of sidemen assembled by frontman Harper. Only the album's brevity keeps it from being a definitive recording on par with the seminal early albums. Still, for a last shot of the classic Subs, this album is definitely worth tracking down.



U.K. Subs - A.W.O.L (flac  236mb)
 
01 Self Destruct 2:26
02 Ship Wrecked 2:10
03 Enemy Awaits 4:07
04 War of the Roses 2:14
05 Police State 3:14
06 New Barbarians 2:50
07 Keep On Running 2:32
08 Limo Life 3:41
09 Postcard from L.A. 4:18
10 Betrayal 4:27
11 Nobody Move 1:34
12 Beer Police 1:34

U.K. Subs - A.W.O.L   (ogg  81mb)

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Cramming 28 tracks into a lean 59 minutes, Singles compiles every A- and B-side released by U.K. Subs during the height of their influence. While the strictly singles format omits some classic album tracks such as "Emotional Blackmail" and "Down on the Farm," what remains is an hour of punchy, melodic punk rock. In fact, the album reveals the Subs as a true missing link between hardcore English punk and '60s music. It's not just the covers of the Zombies' "She's Not There" and the Velvet Underground's "I'm Waiting for the Man." The instrumental "The Harper," with its bluesy guitar licks and harmonica, sounds like a revved-up Yardbirds song, and "Keep on Running" could have fit on the legendary Nuggets anthology. The Subs also have an element that distinguishes them from too many other punk acts: a sense of humor. "New York State Police" is a hilarious swipe at police brutality, while "Teenage" is a dead-on satire of young consumerism. Singles is not only a worthy anthology for fans, who will be pleased that many difficult-to-find tracks are compiled in one place, but will also be the perfect intro to newcomers to one of the best, most underrated bands in punk history.



U.K. Subs - The Singles 1978-1982 (flac  387mb)
 
01 C.I.D. 1:56
02 I Live in a Car 1:26
03 B.I.C. 1:35
04 Stranglehold 2:28
05 World War 1:07
06 Rockers 2:11
07 Tomorrow's Girls 2:25
08 Scum of the Earth 2:20
09 Telephone Numbers 1:06
10 She's Not There 1:37
11 Kicks 1:23
12 Victim 0:58
13 The Same Thing 1:22
14 Warhead 3:05
15 The Harper 1:08
16 Waiting for the Man 2:22
17 Teenage 2:38
18 Left for Dead 1:30
19 New York State Police 2:43
20 Party in Paris 2:54
21 Fall of the Empire 2:15
22 Keep on Running (Til You Burn) 2:35
23 Perfect Girl 2:01
24 Ice Age 2:50
25 Self-Destruct 2:27
26 Police State 3:16
27 War of the Roses 2:17
28 Anti-Warfare 3:21

U.K. Subs - The Singles 1978-1982   (ogg  137mb)

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Jan 16, 2018

RhoDeo 1802 Roots

Hello,

Today’s artist is a Chilean composer, songwriter, folklorist, ethnomusicologist and visual artist. She pioneered the "Chilean New Song", the Nueva canción chilena, a renewal and a reinvention of Chilean folk music which would extend its sphere of influence outside Chile, becoming acknowledged as "The Mother of Latin American folk". In 2011 Andrés Wood directed a biopic about her, titled Violeta se fue a los cielos (Violeta Went to Heaven ).....N'Joy

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Violeta Parra was born in San Fabián de Alico, near San Carlos, Ñuble Province, a small town in southern Chile on 4 October 1917, as Violeta del Carmen Parra Sandoval. She was a member of the prolific Parra family. Among her brothers were the notable modern poet, better known as the "anti-poet", Nicanor Parra, and fellow folklorist Roberto Parra. Her son, Ángel Parra, and her daughter, Isabel Parra, are also important figures in the development of the Nueva Canción Chilena. Their children have also mostly maintained the family's artistic traditions.

Her father was a music teacher and her mother worked on a farm, but sang and played the guitar in her spare time. Two years after Violeta's birth, the family moved to Santiago, then, two years later, to Lautaro and, finally, in 1927, to Chillán. It was in Chillán that Violeta started singing and playing the guitar, together with her siblings Hilda, Eduardo and Roberto; and soon began composing traditional Chilean music. After Parra's father died in 1929, the life circumstances of her family greatly deteriorated. Violeta and her siblings had to work to help feed the family.

In 1932, at the insistence of her brother Nicanor, Parra moved to Santiago to attend the Normal School, staying with relatives. Later, she moved back with her mother and siblings to Edison street, in the Quinta Normal district.  The Parras performed in nightclubs, such as El Tordo Azul and El Popular, in the Mapocho district, interpreting boleros, rancheras, Mexican corridos and other styles. In 1934, she met Luis Cereceda, a railway driver, whom she married four years later, and with whom she had two children, Isabel (born 1939) and Ángel (born 1943). Her husband was a militant communist. At his side, Parra became involved in the progressive movement and the Communist Party of Chile, taking part in the presidential campaign of Gabriel González Videla in 1944.

Parra began singing songs of Spanish origin, from the repertoire of the famous Argentinian singers Lolita Torres and Imperio Argentina. She sang in restaurants and, also, in theatres, calling herself Violeta de Mayo. In 1945, she appeared with her children Isabel and Angel in a Spanish show in the Casanova confectionery.

In 1948, after ten years of marriage, Parra and Luis Cereceda separated. Parra and her sister Hilda began singing together as "The Parra Sisters", and they recorded some of their work on RCA VICTOR. In 1949, Violeta met and married Luis Arce. Their daughter Carmen Luisa was born in the same year. Parra continued performing: she appeared in circuses and toured, with Hilda and with her children, throughout Argentina.  In 1952, Parra's second daughter, Rosita Clara, was born. In that same year, encouraged by her brother Nicanor, Violeta began to collect and collate authentic Chilean folk music from all over the country. She abandoned her old repertoire for folk songs, and began composing her own songs based on traditional folk forms.

Violeta gave recitals at universities, presented by Enrique Bello Cruz, a founder of several cultural magazines. Soon, Parra was invited to the "Summer School" at the University of Concepción. She was also invited to teach courses in folklore at the University of Iquique. In Valparaiso, she was presented at the Chilean-French Institute. Parra's two singles for EMI-Odeon label: "Que Pena Siente el Alma" and "Verso por el Fin del Mundo", and "Casamiento de Negros" and "Verso por Padecimiento" brought her a good measure of popularity.

Don Isaiah Angulo, a tenant farmer, taught her to play the guitarrón, a traditional Chilean guitar-like instrument with 25 strings. Along the way, Parra met Pablo Neruda, who introduced her to his friends. In 1970, he would dedicate the poem "Elegia para Cantar" to her. Between January and September 1954, Parra hosted the immensely successful radio program "Sing Violeta Parra" for Radio Chilena. The program was most often recorded in places where folk music was performed, such as her mother's restaurant in Barrancas. At the end of 1954, Parra participated in another folkloric program, for Radio Agriculture.

Violeta was invited to the World Festival of Youth and Students, in Warsaw, Poland, in July 1955. She then moved to Paris, France, where she performed at the nightclub "L'Escale" in the Quartier Latin. Meanwhile, back in Santiago her daughter Rosita Clara died (age 3). Violeta made contacts with European artists and intellectuals. Through the intervention of the anthropologist Paul Rivet she recorded at the National Sound Archive of the "Musée de l'Homme" La Sorbonne in Paris, where she left a guitarrón and tapes of her collections of Chilean folklore. She travelled to London to make recordings for EMI-Odeon and radio broadcasts from the BBC. Back in Paris, in March 1956, she recorded 16 songs for the French label "Chant du Monde" which launches its first two records with 8 songs each.

In November 1956, Violeta returned to Chile, and recorded the first LP of the series "The folklore of Chile" for the EMI Odeon label: "Violeta Parra and her guitar" which included three of her own compositions. In 1957 she followed with "La cueca" and "La tonada" (EMI Odeón) and "Composiciones de Violeta Parra".  In the following years she built her house “Casa de Palos” on Segovia Street, in the municipality of La Reina. She continued giving recitals in major cultural centers in Santiago, travelling all over the country to research, organize concerts and give lectures and workshops about folklore. She travelled north to investigate and record the religious festival "La Tirana".

Violeta Parra exerted a significant influence on Héctor Pavez and Gabriela Pizarro, who would become great performers and researchers in their own right. The product of this collaboration is evident in the play "La Celebración de la Minga" staged at the Teatro Municipal de Santiago.  She composed the music for the documentaries Wicker and Trilla, and contributed to the film Casamiento de negros, performed by Sergio Bravo. She wrote the book Cantos Folklóricos Chilenos which gathered all the research conducted so far, with photographs by Sergio Larraín and musical scores performed by Gastón Soublette (Santiago, Nascimento, 1979). She also wrote the Décimas autobiográficas, work in verse recounting her from her childhood to her trip to Europe.

She started a serious interest in ceramics, painting and arpillera embroidery. As a result of a severe hepatitis in 1959 that forced her to stay in bed, her work as a painter and arpillerista was developed greatly, so much so that the same year she exhibited her oil paintings and arpilleras at the First and also the Second Outdoor Exhibition of Fine Arts at Santiago's Parque Forestal.

On 4 October 1960, the day of her birthday, she met Swiss clarinetist Gilbert Favre with whom she became romantically involved. In 1961 she traveled to Buenos Aires, Argentina, where she exhibited her paintings, appeared in TV, gave recitals at the Teatro IFT and recorded an album of original songs for EMI Odeon - which was banned.


In June 1962 she returned to Santiago. With her children Isabel and Angel, and her granddaughter Tita, she embarked, with the Chilean delegation, for Finland to participate in the 8th "World Festival of Youth and Students" held in Helsinki. After touring the Soviet Union, Germany, Italy and France, Violeta Parra moved to Paris, where she performed at La Candelaria and L'Escale, in the Latin Quarter, gave recitals at the "Théâtre Des Nations" of UNESCO and performed on radio and television with her children. She then started living with Gilbert Favre in Geneva, dividing her time between France and Switzerland, where she also gave concerts, appeared in TV and exhibited her art.

In 1963 she recorded in Paris, revolutionary and peasant songs, which would be published in 1971 under the title "Songs rediscovered in Paris" She wrote the book "Popular Poetry of the Andes". The Parras took part in the concert of "L'Humanité" (official newspaper of the French Communist Party). An Argentine musician friend recorded at her home a version of "El Gavilán" ("The Hawk"), interpreted by Violeta Parra accompanied by her granddaughter on percussion. Violeta accompanied her children in the LP "Los Parra de Chillán" for the Barclay label. She began playing the cuatro, an instrument of Venezuelan origin, and the charango, an instrument of the high plateaus.

In April 1964 she did an exhibition of her arpilleras, oil paintings and wire sculptures in the Museum of Decorative Arts of the Louvre - the first solo exhibition of a Latin American artist at the museum. In 1965, the publisher François Maspero, Paris, published her book "Poésie Populaire des Andes". In Geneva, Swiss television made a documentary about the artist and her work, "Violeta Parra, Chilean Embroiderer".

Favre and Parra returned to South America, in June 1965. Violeta recorded two 45s, one with her daughter Isabel and another to instrumental music for cuatro and quena with Gilbert Favre, whom she christened "El Tocador Afuerino" (The outsider musician). Her music now incorporated the Venezuelan cuatro and the charango from the plateaus of northern Chile. EMI Odeon circulated the LP "Remembering Chile (a Chilean in Paris)," whose cover was illustrated with her own arpilleras. Soon after, however, Favre and Parra broke up, provoked by his desire to live in Bolivia where he was part of a successful Bolivian music act, Los Jairas.

Parra’s energy was invested in reviving a unique version of the Peña (now known as La Peña de Los Parra), a community center for the arts and for political activism. Some have stated she established the first 'peña', but as said by the RAE, places such as these had been called that at least since 1936. Parra s Peña was a tent (somewhat similar looking to a circus tent) that she set up on a 30 x 30 meter piece of land in the Parque La Quintrala, at number 340 Carmen Street, in today’s La Reina municipality of Santiago, in the area once known as la Cañada. Her tent hosted musical spectacles where she often sang with her children, and she and her children also lived on the same land. In La Reina, at La Cañada 7200, she also established a cultural center called "La Carpa de la Reina" inaugurated on 17 December 1965. She also installed a folk peña in the International Fair of Santiago (FISA), where she was invited. On the same year, she participated in numerous national television programs and signed a contract with Radio Minería which would be the last radio station to be used as a platform for her work.

Under the EMi Odeón label, in 1966 was released the LP "La Carpa de La Reina" featuring three songs performed by Violeta Parra and nine by guest artists announced at the carpa by Violeta herself. She travelled to La Paz, Bolivia, to meet with Gilbert Favre, where she regularly appeared in the Peña. She came back to Chile with Altiplano groups, presenting them in her carpa, on television and in her children's Peña. She also performed in concert at the Chilean southern cities of Osorno and Punta Arenas, invited by René Largo Farias, under the "Chile Ríe y Canta" ("Chile Laughs and Sings") program. Accompanied by her children and Uruguayan Alberto Zapicán, she recorded for RCA Victor the LP "The Last Compositions of Violeta Parra". In that year, Favre returned briefly to Chile with his group, but declined to stay, because in the meantime he had married in Bolivia.

Her most renowned song, Gracias a la Vida ("Thanks to Life"), was popularized throughout Latin America by Mercedes Sosa, in Brazil by Elis Regina and later in the US by Joan Baez. It remains one of the most covered Latin American songs in history. Other notable covers of this tragic, but widely beloved, folk anthem include the Italian guitar-vocal solo of Adriana Mezzadri and La Oreja de Van Gogh at the 2005 Viña del Mar International Song Festival. It has been treated by classically trained musicians such as in the fully orchestrated rendition by conservatory-trained Alberto Cortez. The song has been re-recorded by several Latin artists and Canadian Michael Bublé to gather funds for the Chilean people affected by the earthquake in Chile, February 2010.

"Gracias a la vida" was written and recorded in 1964-65 following Parra's separation with her long-time partner. It was released in Las Últimas Composiciones (1966), the last album Parra published before taking her life in 1967. Parra's lyrics are ambiguous at first: the song may be read as a romantic celebration of life and individual experience,however the circumstances surrounding the song suggest that Parra also intended the song as a sort of suicide note, thanking life for all it has given her. It may even be read as ironic, pointing out that a life full of good health, opportunity and worldly experience may not offer any consolation to grief and the contradictory nature of the human condition.


    Gracias a la vida que me ha dado tanto
    Me dio dos luceros que cuando los abro
    Perfecto distingo lo negro del blanco
    Y en el alto cielo su fondo estrellado
    Y en las multitudes el hombre que yo amo

Translated into English:

    Thanks to life, which has given me so much
    It gave me two bright stars that when I open them,
    I perfectly distinguish the black from white
    And in the sky above, her starry backdrop
    And within the multitudes the man I love

"Volver a los Diecisiete"

Another highly regarded song - the last she wrote - is "Volver a los Diecisiete" ("Being Seventeen Again"). It celebrates the themes of youthful life, in tragic contrast to her biography.Unlike much popular music, it moves through minor key progression creating an introspective if not melancholy mood and thus has lent itself to classical treatment as well as popular music. Despite its originality, Parra's music was deeply rooted in folk song traditions, as is the case with Nueva Canción in general.


Parra died by suicide in 1967 by a gunshot to the head. Several memorials were held after her death, both in Chile and abroad. She was an inspiration for several Latin-American artists, such as Victor Jara and the musical movement of the "Nueva Cancion Chilena", which renewed interest in Chilean folklore.

In 1992, the Violeta Parra Foundation was founded at the initiative of her children, with the aim to group, organize and disseminate her still-unpublished work.In 1997, with the participation of Violeta Parra Foundation and the Department of Cultural Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Chile, her visual work was exhibited in the Museum of Decorative Arts of the Louvre Museum, Paris. In 2007, the 90th anniversary of her birth was commemorated with an exhibition of her visual work at the Centro Cultural Palacio La Moneda and the release of a collection of her art work titled, "Visual Work of Violeta Parra".

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Violeta Went to Heaven (Spanish: Violeta se fue a los cielos) is a 2011 Chilean biopic about singer and folklorist Violeta Parra, directed by Andrés Wood. The film is based on an eponymous book, a biography, written by Ángel Parra, Violeta's son with Luis Cereceda Arenas. Parra collaborated on the film, The film was selected as the Chilean entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 84th Academy Awards, but it did not make the final shortlist. The film won Sundance’s 2012 World Cinema Dramatic Jury Prize.




Violeta se fue a los cielos (Violeta Went to Heaven)  (avi   1520mb)

 included are English, Spanish and Italian subtitles 1 hour 44min


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Echanting, fascinating collection of Chilean folk songs, mostly vocals and guitars, with introductions by Violeta Parra, but also some ace runs into accordion and music box melodies and martial percussive pieces. Interesting for anyone looking to the Bolivian folk roots of Elysia Crampton

In this collection, Volume III of Parra's Folk Music of Chile series, Parra introduces us to the Cueca, a traditional folk music style and Chile's national dance, which is sung and danced at parties and festivities. Although Cuecas were played on the radio, Parra introduces listeners to popular forms of Cueca she recovered in her field work collecting traditional songs. Navigating Chile's thin land mass from Santiago to Concepción, Parra heard people in the countryside performing these songs. In her introduction, Parra identifies four types of Cueca: the short Corta, the waltz Valceada, the long Larga voluntaria, and the Balance/obligatoria where the singer individually calls on a man and then a women to dance. Casting herself in the role of ethnomusicologist, this intense musical investigation of Chile's popular folk song traditions went on to greatly influence Parra's own songwriting. The connection with her country's traditions earned her the reputation as Chile's foremost poet and folk singer.



Violeta Parra - La Cueca   (flac  139mb)

01 Voz De Presentación De Violeta Parra 1:47
02 La Cueca Del Balance 2:36
03 Adiós Que Se Va Segundo 1:30
04 Floreció El Copihue Rojo 1:35
05 Un Viejo Me Pidió Un Beso 1:27
06 Cueca Del Organillero 1:24
07 Cuando Estaba Chiquillona 1:38
08 La Chiquilla En Arauco 1:42
09 Quisiera Ser Palomita 1:35
10 En El Cuarto De La Carmela 1:28
11 La Muerte Se Fue A Bañar 1:35
12 De La Pierna De Un Zancudo 1:27
13 Dame De Tu Pelo Rubio 1:28
14 Presentación Por Violeta Parra 1:21
15 Yo Vi Llorar A Un Hombre 1:35
16 Tengo Que Hacer Un Retrato 1:42
17 Pañuelo Blanco Me Diste 1:34
18 La Cueca Del Payaso 1:54
19 La Mariposa 1:44
20 Para Qué Me Casaría 1:32
21 Un Panadero Fue A Misa 1:23
22 La Niña Que Está Bailando 1:44
23 Cueca Con Harmónica 1:15
24 El Ají 'Maúro' 1:41
25 En La Cumbre De Los Andes 1:38
26 La Cueca Larga 3:41
27 Despedida 0:47

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Cantos Campesinos includes rare songs from the early part of Violeta Parra's career. Violeta traveled throughout the Chilean country side and collected songs composed and sung by campesinos in remote areas of Chile. This album, together with Las Décimas, is the best of La Violeta for lovers of authentic peasant singing. Especially Songs by Weight, Live the light of Don Creator and Viva Dios, live the Virgin, those who, beyond their religious content, have the courage to use the words and ways of playing the guitar that are still heard in the Chilean fields today. A delight full of humor, love, devotion and crib Creole.



 Violeta Parra - Cantos Campesinos   (flac  103mb)

01 El Primer Día Del Señor 2:19
02 Entre Aquel Apostolado 3:21
03 Versos Por Ponderación 2:33
04 Alulú 1:57
05 Arriba De Aquel Árbol 2:09
06 Viva La Luz De Don Creador 1:45
07 Los Padres Saben Sentir 2:48
08 Viva Dios, Viva La Virgen 1:58
09 Casamiento De Negros 1:42
10 Qué Pena Siente El Alma 1:57
11 Ausencia 2:07
12 El Palomo 2:35
13 Miren Como Corre El Agua 1:27
14 Dónde Estás Prenda Querida 2:22
15 Ojos Negros Matadores 1:30
16 Aquí Se Acaba Esta Cueca 1:30
17 La Jardinera 1:59
18 Violeta Ausente 2:19

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Hace Falta Un Guerrillero corresponds to an "anthological" album in which songs that represent the different stages of Violeta's career as folkloric composer are gathered. In fact, new recordings of his first compositions are delivered, such as "Por la mañanita", "The repentant son", "Casamiento de negros" and "La jardinera" (dated by Isabel Parra as composed between 1950 and 1954),  Adding some of his latest compositions, such as «It takes a guerrilla fighter», «Twenty-one are the pains», «What brings you here», «I sing the difference» and «The people».

Given this characteristic, several themes appear in new versions: for example, "Por la mañanita", which, according to the notes corresponds to the first song that Violeta composed, had appeared on a single (today inencontrable) of Las Hermanas Parra, published in 1953 . Another case is that of "Marriage of Blacks", which had already appeared on a solo single by Violeta in 1955 , addition to the French discs of Le Chant du Monde , in 1956. The version that appears in this long play corresponds to the voice of Violeta only accompanied by his guitar.

Special mention deserves "La jardinera", which appears here in its fourth version, after the original single of 1954 (accredited to Las Hermanas Parra , although sung by Violeta and her daughter Isabel ), the solo reissue of Violeta in 1955 and the recording of Paris of 1956 .

Among the new songs, several critics were struck by the appearance of the first songs of Violeta's social content. In this regard, she recognizes in the notes of the album:

    The obligation of each artist is to put their creative power at the service of men. Singing to the arroyitos and florcitas is already old. Today life is harder and the suffering of the people can not be left unattended by the artist.
    Violeta Parra, Notes to «I sing the difference»

In that sense, "It takes a guerrilla fighter" expresses the desire of Violeta to be the mother of a guerrilla "like Manuel Rodriguez", which, according to Soublette, indicates that the author "wants a driver who is capable of changing the social order. On the other hand, the aforementioned "I sing the difference" refers to an event that Violeta herself witnessed: the birth of her neighbor Luisa, who "she saw with her own eyes and attended with her own hands ", all within the framework of the pomp of the celebrations of the 150th anniversary of the independence of Chile, taking into account the same" social "purpose of the song, Violeta musicalizes the poem" The people "of Pablo Neruda (contained in the book Canto General de 1950 ).



Violeta Parra - Hace Falta Un Guerrillero   (flac  132mb)

01 Hace Falta Un Guerrillero 3:44
02 Veintiuno Son Los Dolores 2:15
03 Por La Mañanita 2:51
04 El Día De Tu Cumpleaños 1:46
05 El Chuico Y La Damajuana 2:16
06 Yo Canto A La Diferencia 4:53
07 Amigos Tengo Por Cientos 3:11
08 "Por Pa" Por Pasármelo Tomando" 1:36
09 Qué Te Trae Por Aquí 4:06
10 Casamiento De Negros 1:45
11 El Pueblo (Paseaba El Pueblo Sus Banderas Rojas) 2:30
12 La Jardinera 3:01
13 Puerto Montt Está Temblando 5:45

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This album is composed of interviews, lectures and songs compiled by Violeta in the Chilean countryside at the end of the 1950s. disc were recorded in the summer of 1960, and they remained unpublished in CD until 2010.
This would be an ambitious project, with a mixture of orchestra, and the intervention of typical Chilean instruments, such as "guitars, harps, drums and trutrucas (...)". The folklorist herself would be the main protagonist, since, in her own words:

This song has to be sung even by myself. Because pain can not be sung by an academic voice, a conservatory voice. It has to be a suffering voice like mine, which has been suffering for forty years.
   
The second track presents an extract of the ballet, which includes the first part, corresponding to the meeting of the main characters. Violeta would leave this project unfinished ballet.3 The only preserved fragment is precisely this song, known simply as "The Sparrowhawk", of which two other recorded versions are preserved through tapes (never under study): these two versions they have been added to different editions on CD, as in Cantos de Chile (Present / Absent), Compositions for Guitar and Songs Reencountered in Paris.

l Gavilán «The hawk» is, in short, one of the most analyzed songs of Violeta Parra's discography. Several university-level theses analyze their unusual musical and poetic structure; As an example, the researcher Christian Spencer describes this work, together with the "Anticuecas" as: «a monument of reflective-abstract nature and at the same time a musicological and foundational phenomenon.

The third track of the album contains the lecture that Violeta Parra was to make in the aforementioned Summer School, happily preserved in its entirety. The recording is dated January 5, 1960, and was made in the Auditorium of the School of Education of the Universidad de Concepción. During it, Violeta reads part of the manuscript of the book Chilean Folk Songs, in which she recounts her experiences rescuing authentic Chilean folklore through the fields. As an illustration of the stories presented, Violeta sings, accompanied by guitar, songs by some of her informants Alberto Cruz, Juan de Dios Leiva, Rosa Lorca, Antonio Suárez, Agustín Rebolledo, Emilio Lobos and Gabriel Soto.1 On several occasions it is possible listen to the reactions of the audience to the stories told by Violeta.



Violeta Parra - En el Aula Magna de Concepción   (flac  207mb)

01 Entrevista Radial De Mario Céspedes A Violeta Parra 5:08
02 l Gavilán, Gavilán 14:45
03 Charla En El Aula Magna Y Canciones Finales (38:20)
(La Una Es La Principiante, Angel Glorioso Y Bendito, Décimas Por Padecimiento, Un Día Que Asuero Estaba
Huyendo Voy De Tus Rabias, Casamiento De Negros, El Sacristán)

Violeta Parra - En el Aula Magna de Concepción (ogg  88mb)

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This is an excellent collection of better compositions and folks recompilations from the greater Latin American's icons of the popular music. You can hear the well-known "Casamiento de Negros (Marriage of Black)," " Volver a los 17 (Back to the 17)," " Run Run Se Fue P'al Norte (Run Run Moved To North)" and, "Gracias a la Vida (Thanks to the Life)," of course.

The cuecas are included "Violeta Ausente (Absent Violeta)" and "La Jardinera (The Jardiniere)," with ethnic rhythmic shades. A deep political sign could hear in the lyrics of "La Carta (The Letter)," "Miren como Sonrien (Look at How they Smile)," "Qué dirá el Santo Padre (What will Pope Say)," and "Arauco tiene una pena (Arauco Has A Pain)". Some tracks melt with the melancholy of the Araucanian drum of "The Guillatún" and "Up Burning the Sun." As interludes could listen some "Decimas" (rhymes of roguish and country origin but with artful social content). The best of the album is the improvement of the sound regarding another CD non remastered. Remember these recordings were made between 1955 and 1966.



Violeta Parra - Antologia   (flac  173mb)

01 Casamiento de Negros 1:39
02 Que Pena Siente el Alma 1:56
03 Dónde Estás Prenda Querida 2:22
04 Décima: Pa' Cantar de un Improviso...0:30
05 Violeta Ausente 2:20
06 Viva la Luz de Don Creador 1:45
07 El Palomo 2:36
08 En Este Mundo Moderno 0:22
09 Arauco Tiene Una Pena 2:58
10 Arriba Quemando el Sol 2:41
11 Décima: Yo No Protesto Por Mí...0:18
12 La Jardinera 1:59
13 Del Norte Vengo Maruca 2:44
14 La Carta 2:57
15 Décima: Dispénsenme las Chiquillas...0:26
16 Miren Como Sonríen 2:24
17 Según el Favor del Viento 2:28
18 Rim del Angelito 2:02
19 Mazurquica Modernica 2:18
20 Qué Dirá el Santo Padre 2:53
21 Volver a los 17 4:08
22 El Guillatún 2:26
23 El Albertío 2:06
24 Décima: 61 Besos, Creo 62...0:15
25 Run Ru Se Fue P'al Norte 3:55
26 Gracias a la Vida 4:31

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Jan 15, 2018

RhoDeo 1802 Neverwhere 3

Hello,


 Confused ? Why not delve into London's underbelly......'N Joy

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Neil Richard MacKinnon Gaiman born 10 November 1960 is an English author of short fiction, novels, comic books, graphic novels, audio theatre, and films. His notable works include the comic book series The Sandman and novels Stardust, American Gods, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. He has won numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula, and Bram Stoker awards, as well as the Newbery and Carnegie medals. He is the first author to win both the Newbery and the Carnegie medals for the same work, The Graveyard Book (2008). In 2013, The Ocean at the End of the Lane was voted Book of the Year in the British National Book Awards

Gaiman was able to read at the age of four. He said, "I was a reader. I loved reading. Reading things gave me pleasure. I was very good at most subjects in school, not because I had any particular aptitude in them, but because normally on the first day of school they'd hand out schoolbooks, and I'd read them—which would mean that I'd know what was coming up, because I'd read it." When he was about ten years old, he read his way through the works of Dennis Wheatley, where especially The Ka of Gifford Hillary and The Haunting of Toby Jugg made an impact on him. One work that made a particular impression on him was J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings from his school library, although it only had the first two volumes of the novel. He consistently took them out and read them. He would later win the school English prize and the school reading prize, enabling him to finally acquire the third volume.

For his seventh birthday, Gaiman received C. S. Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia series. He later recalled that "I admired his use of parenthetical statements to the reader, where he would just talk to you ... I'd think, 'Oh, my gosh, that is so cool! I want to do that! When I become an author, I want to be able to do things in parentheses.' I liked the power of putting things in brackets." Narnia also introduced him to literary awards, specifically the 1956 Carnegie Medal won by the concluding volume. When Gaiman won the 2010 Medal himself, the press reported him recalling, "it had to be the most important literary award there ever was" and observing, "if you can make yourself aged seven happy, you're really doing well – it's like writing a letter to yourself aged seven."

Gaiman has said Roger Zelazny was the author who influenced him the most, with this influence particularly seen in Gaiman's literary style and the topics he writes about. Other authors Gaiman says "furnished the inside of my mind and set me to writing" include Moorcock, Ellison, Samuel R. Delany, Angela Carter, Lafferty and Le Guin.

In the early 1980s, Gaiman pursued journalism, conducting interviews and writing book reviews, as a means to learn about the world and to make connections that he hoped would later assist him in getting published. He wrote and reviewed extensively for the British Fantasy Society. His first professional short story publication was "Featherquest", a fantasy story, in Imagine Magazine in May 1984.

When waiting for a train at London's Victoria Station in 1984, Gaiman noticed a copy of Swamp Thing written by Alan Moore, and carefully read it. Moore's fresh and vigorous approach to comics had such an impact on Gaiman that he would later write "that was the final straw, what was left of my resistance crumbled. I proceeded to make regular and frequent visits to London's Forbidden Planet shop to buy comics".

In 1984, he wrote his first book, a biography of the band Duran Duran, as well as Ghastly Beyond Belief, a book of quotations, with Kim Newman. Even though Gaiman thought he had done a terrible job, the book's first edition sold out very quickly. When he went to relinquish his rights to the book, he discovered the publisher had gone bankrupt. After this, he was offered a job by Penthouse. He refused the offer.

He also wrote interviews and articles for many British magazines, including Knave. During this he sometimes wrote under pseudonyms, including Gerry Musgrave, Richard Grey, and "a couple of house names". Gaiman has said he ended his journalism career in 1987 because British newspapers regularly publish untruths as fact. In the late 1980s, he wrote Don't Panic: The Official Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Companion in what he calls a "classic English humour" style. Following this he wrote the opening of what would become his collaboration with fellow English author Terry Pratchett on the comic novel Good Omens, about the impending apocalypse.

...more next week


Neverwhere is a radio drama based on the novel Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman. It was dramatised by Dirk Maggs.

Created by Neil Gaiman
Written by Neil Gaiman, Dirk Maggs
Directed by Dirk Maggs, Heather Larmour
Produced by Heather Larmour

Broadcast

On Saturday 16 March 2013, BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 4 Extra broadcast the first, hour-long, episode of Neverwhere. The subsequent five half-hour episodes were broadcast throughout the following week on Radio 4 Extra and made available worldwide after broadcast on BBC iPlayer. It was rebroadcast on BBC Radio 4 starting on Dec 25th 2013 and continuing for 6 days.


Beneath the streets of London there is another London. A subterranean labyrinth of sewers and abandoned tube stations. A somewhere that is Neverwhere.

An act of kindness sees Richard Mayhew catapulted from his ordinary life into a subterranean world under the streets of London. Stopping to help an injured girl on a London street, Richard is thrust from his workaday existence into the strange world of London Below.

So begins a curious and mysterious adventure deep beneath the streets of London, a London of shadows where the tube cry of 'Mind the Gap' takes on new meaning; for the inhabitants of this murky domain are those who have fallen through the gaps in society, the dispossessed, the homeless. Here Richard meets the Earl of Earl's Court, Old Bailey and Hammersmith, faces a life-threatening ordeal at the hands of the Black Friars, comes face to face with Great Beast of London, and encounters an Angel. Called Islington.

Joining the mysterious girl named Door and her companions, the Marquis de Carabas and the bodyguard, Hunter, Richard embarks on an extraordinary quest to escape from the clutches of the fiendish assassins Croup and Vandemar and to discover who ordered them to murder her family. All the while trying to work out how to get back to his old life in London Above.

A six part adaption of Neil Gaiman's novel adapted by Dirk Maggs, sees James McAvoy as Richard lead a stellar cast

Cast

Richard Mayhew - James McAvoy
Lady Door - Natalie Dormer
The Marquis de Carabas - David Harewood
Hunter - Sophie Okonedo
The Angel Islington - Benedict Cumberbatch
Mr. Croup - Anthony Head
Mr. Vandemar - David Schofield
Old Bailey - Bernard Cribbins
Lamia - Lucy Cohu
The Abbott - George Harris
The Earl - Sir Christopher Lee
Jessica - Romola Garai
Figgis/The Fop With No Name - Neil Gaiman
Tooley - Andrew Sachs
Fuliginous/Ruislip/Blackfriar - Don Gilet
Sable/Sump/Clarence/Homeless man - Abdul Salis
Gary/Second Guard - Paul Chequer
Anaesthesia/Female Tenant/Match Girl - Yasmin Paige
Lord Ratspeaker - Johnny Vegas
Varney/Homeless man/Letting Agent/First Guard - Stephen Marcus
Sylvia/Old woman/Dream Hawker/Mother - Karen Archer
Lord Portico/Stockton - Jon Glover
Iliaster - Paul Stonehouse



Neil Gaiman - Neverwhere part 3 (mp3  26mb)


03 The Angel Islington 28:27


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previously

Neil Gaiman - Neverwhere part 1 (mp3  53mb)
Neil Gaiman - Neverwhere part 2 (mp3  26mb)


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Jan 14, 2018

RhoDeo 1802 Sundaze

Hello, I said last week that it would be the last Stereolab posting, in a way it was but then again. Music life continued for Laetitia Sadier being the voice of the band by 2010 she released an excellent album The Trip furthermore a desperate visitor requested the one compilation album i didn't post (Refried Ectoplasm) well here it is..


Today's Artist is a French musician who was formerly a founding member of the London-based avant-pop band Stereolab. While a member, she formed her side project Monade in 1996 to play her own solo songs; and retired the project in 2009 to perform new solo work under her name.. ........N'Joy

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 Best known as the lead vocalist for Stereolab, Laetitia Sadier was born in France and was working as a nanny in the late '80s when she met McCarthy member Tim Gane at one of the band's gigs in Paris. She followed Gane to London and the duo formed Stereolab soon after McCarthy disbanded in 1990. The pair was inspired by lounge-pop, bossa nova, film music, and Krautrock, but Sadier's hypnotic vocals and leftist lyrics made the band's sound even more distinctive.

Stereolab earned critical acclaim for albums such as 1993's Transient Random Noise Bursts with Announcements, 1995's Mars Audiac Quintet, and 1996's Emperor Tomato Ketchup; around that time, Sadier began working on her own project, Monade, recording with Pram's Rosie Cuckston. In 1998, she gave birth to her and Gane's son Alex, and the following year she returned with Stereolab for the group's Cobra and Phases Group Play Voltage in the Milky Night and 2001's Sound-Dust.

Sadier was working as a nanny when she met McCarthy guitarist Tim Gane at a gig of the band in Paris during the late 1980s. Sadier was disillusioned with the rock scene in France, and soon moved to London to be with Gane and to pursue her career. She contributed vocals to McCarthy's final albums and when McCarthy broke up in 1990, she and Gane immediately formed Stereolab. For the first incarnation of the band, they enlisted ex-Chills bassist Martin Kean, drummer Joe Dilworth and Gina Morris on backing vocals. While Tim Gane has written the bulk of the music in Stereolab, Sadier is the main contributor of lyrics, written in both English and French.

In 1996, Sadier formed Monade with Pram's Rosie Cuckston. Monade released the singles "The Sunrise Telling" and "Witch Hazel/Ode to a Keyring" in 1997. The band's debut album Socialisme ou barbarie: The Bedroom Recordings was released on Duophonic Records in Europe and Drag City in the US in 2003. Their second album A Few Steps More was released on Too Pure in 2004. Monade's third, Monstre cosmic, was released in February 2008 on Duophonic.

Sadier has contributed vocals to various groups and projects, at times along with the late Stereolab member Mary Hansen. She and Hansen had contributed vocals to various recordings of The High Llamas (band of sometimes-Stereolab member Sean O'Hagan) and to the Gane/O'Hagan side project Turn On. Sadier added French backing vocals on "To the End", a top 20 hit for Blur in 1994. In 1995, she recorded the Serge Gainsbourg/Brigitte Bardot song "Bonnie and Clyde" with Luna. In 2001, Sadier sang on "Sol y sombra" on Fugu's Fugu 1 LP on Minty Fresh Records. In 2002, Sadier sang the chorus on "New Wave" from Common's album Electric Circus. She sang lead vocals on "Haiku One" from Sigmatropic's 2004 album Sixteen Haiku & Other Stories which was an album based on the poetry of Greek poet Giorgos Seferis. In 2009 the French label Deux Mille released an EP which features Sadier singing with Toulouse-based band Momotte.
Sadier performing with Monade

Throughout the years, Sadier has occasionally collaborated with German electronica group Mouse on Mars. In 1997, Sadier sung on "Schnick Schnack Meltmade" on Mouse on Mars' Autoditacker LP, and she and Mary Hansen contributed vocals to the Cache cœur naif EP. In turn, Mouse on Mars produced tracks on Stereolab's Dots and Loops LP. In 2007, Sadier wrote songs with MoM and toured with them in Italy. They have yet to record the songs for release. Sadier also contributed backing vocals to the track "Go Round" on The Hair and Skin Trading Company's 1993 album Over Valence. Sadier also wrote and sang the lyrics to the track "Quick Canal" by Atlas Sound for the 2009 release Logos. Laetitia is a collaborator on the Tyler, the Creator album "Wolf". She sings an interlude on the track "PartyIsntOver/Campfire/Bimmer".

Laetitia sings on the "Summer Long" song, in Brazilian band Mombojó's Alexandre 2014 album. She wrote the lyrics and sings "La Ballade" from Adrian Younge's 2016 album "Something About April II", as well as singing on the 2016 album I'm Willing by Marker Starling. In 2017, she appeared on the Deerhoof song “Come Down Here and Say That”, from their album Mountain Moves.

Stereolab went on hiatus in 2009 and Sadier began work on her first solo album, working with the Spinanes' Rebecca Gates, April March, Richard Swift, and former Monade players Julien Gasc and Emmanuel Mario. The Trip was released in 2010, the same year that another Stereolab collection, Not Music, arrived. Two years later, the more introspective, political Silencio appeared. For 2014's Something Shines, Sadier recorded in London and throughout Europe, crafting a lavish sound that recalled Stereolab's most orchestral moments. That year also saw the release of We Are Divine, the first album from Little Tornados, which included filmmaker David Thayer among its members.

After working with Giorgio Tuma on a 2015 single, she formed another new group: the Laetitia Sadier Source Ensemble also featured Thayer as well as longtime collaborators Emmanuel Mario and Xavi Munoz, keyboardist Phil M.F.U., and guitarist Mason Le Long. The group's debut, Find Me Finding You, was released in 2017 and included contributions from Hot Chip's Alexis Taylor and cornetist Rob Mazurek.

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It took almost 20 years of making music for Laetitia Sadier to release a true solo album. Though her Stereolab side project Monade began as her own endeavor, it morphed into another band (albeit one fronted by Sadier). While it features two former Monade members, The Trip feels more like a true solo effort, if only because its raison d’être is so personal: Sadier was inspired by her younger sister Noelle’s suicide, and her grieving process, to write these songs. On both Stereolab and Monade's music, Sadier's lovely alto is aloof, and her lyrics largely theoretical; while this is true on The Trip to a certain extent, the atmosphere is much more intimate, and the subject matter is so emotional that a little distance is welcome. The Trip's first step is its most stunning: “One Million Year Trip” begins with a Krautrock-tinged groove that will be familiar to fans, but it’s more open and flowing here than on any of her other projects. Sadier has never sounded so direct: “I lost someone precious,” she sings as analog synths sparkle like starlight around her, “She has a long way to travel, so I will open my heart/And let the pain run along as there is no point in holding on.” It’s a pretty remarkable way of looking at death and loss -- philosophical and somewhat detached, yet also kind, to herself and her sister’s memory. The rest of The Trip charts the journeys she takes through her grief and her sister takes to wherever she’s headed. The Spinanes' Rebecca Gates provides backing vocals that evoke Sadier's little sister, particularly on the surprisingly groovy “Natural Child,” and the organic, largely acoustic arrangements give the album a warmer, more immediately welcoming sound than either Stereolab or Monade. Sadier’s moods range from “Fluid Sand”'s reflections to “Statues Can Bend”'s unadulterated grief to the anger she injects into her restless cover of Wendy & Bonnie's “By the Sea.” She imbues The Trip's other covers with just as much emotion, whether it’s the short and somber reading of “Summertime” or the more lighthearted “Un Soir, un Chien,” originally by Les Rita Mitsouko. Covers aside, this is the most personal music of Sadier’s career, and a promising glimpse of what she can do on her own.



Laetitia Sadier - The Trip (flac 195mb)

01 One Million Year Trip 5:03
02 Fluid Sand 4:34
03 Our Interests Are The Same 0:11
04 Natural Child 4:01
05 Statues Can Bend 2:57
06 By The Sea 3:45
07 Unfasten 0:25
08 Un Soir, Un Chien 4:50
09 Another Monster 2:49
10 Ceci Est Le Coeur 3:21
11 Summertime 1:59
12 Release, Open Your Little Earthling Hands 0:30

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Laetitia Sadier's first solo album, The Trip, centered around accepting the loss of her sister, but Silencio's focus is more global, and yet more intimate. Inspired by a profound moment of silence Sadier experienced in a medieval Spanish city filled with churches, the album finds her slowly but surely evolving Stereolab's style into her own thoughtful version of singer/songwriter pop. There's a newfound directness and intimacy on the largely spoken word "Moi Sans Zach" and the other songs in Sadier's native tongue, but most strikingly on Silencio's many political moments. While it was fairly easy to tune out the Marxist leanings of Stereolab's songs if one wanted, there's no missing Sadier's intelligent outrage on "The Rule of the Game," where she sings, "The ruling class neglects again responsibility/Overindulged children drawn to cruel games" or "Ascultation to the Nation"'s takedown of the G20: "What do we care about these self-proclaimed authorities?...They are politically illegitimate" or the enough-said song title "There Is a Price to Pay for Freedom (And It Isn't Security)." Her protests may be cerebral instead of fiery, but the passion behind them is unmistakable; indeed, Silencio's righteous anger is sometimes a more immediate hook than the subtle music surrounding it. While there is a definite lounge-pop feel to these songs, the tenor is understandably more serious and sophisticated, stripped of much of the musical irony that Stereolab played with as deftly as any Moog. Despite its stardust synths, "Between Earth and Heaven" tilts further toward jazz than any of Sadier's previous music, and the larger parts that guitar, piano, and strings play on songs such as "Silent Spot" and "Fragment pour Le Future de L'Homme" reflect an increasingly mature style that flatters her distinctive and timeless vocals. While she allows a few light-hearted moments among Silencio's heady concerns -- including the lovely "Find Me the Pulse of the Universe" and "Next Time You See Me," a tiny burst of pop sunshine that reunites her with Tim Gane -- the album's heart resides in its final track. A whispered-word meditation in French and English, "Invitation Au Silence," culminates with Sadier urging listeners to "return to ourselves" in reverberating stillness recorded in a church in southwest France. It's a fitting ending to an album that begins as a one-woman cabaret show discussing humanity's past and future and remains the work of a singular voice, one that recognizes that silence is just as vital as music.



Laetitia Sadier - Silencio (flac  287mb)

01 The Rule Of The Game 5:01
02 Find Me The Pulse Of The Universe 2:53
03 Silent Spot 3:00
04 Auscultation To The Nation 4:47
05 There Is A Price To Pay For Freedom (And It Isn't Security) 4:22
06 Moi Sans Zach 3:49
07 Between Earth And Heaven 4:08
08 Lightning Thunderbolt 3:16
09 Fragment Pour Le Future De L'Homme 4:41
10 Merci De M'Avoir Donne La Vie 4:34
11 Next Time You See Me 2:43
12 Invitation Au Silence 4:30

Laetitia Sadier - Silencio  (ogg  107mb)

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Something Shines is nothing if not aptly named. Filled with music that's luminous and a little distant, Laetitia Sadier's third album often feels like a culmination of her career to date in its mix of elegant sounds and political lyrics. Recorded throughout Europe and featuring collaborators such as Giorgio Tuma (who co-wrote the standout "Release from the Centre of Your Heart"), these songs find Sadier returning to a more lavishly orchestrated, Stereolab-like sound after the relatively intimate Silencio. The tumbling backing vocals on the seven-minute opener "Quantum Soup" even feel like a twice-removed cousin of Emperor Tomato Ketchup's "Metronomic Underground"; meanwhile, "The Scene of the Lie" sets lyrics that allude to Guy Debord's The Society of the Spectacle -- a longtime influence on Sadier's work -- to music that's psychedelic down to its flanged drums. A more open-ended set than Silencio, Something Shines requires closer, more engaged listening as Sadier alternates between concise statements and stream-of-consciousness reveries filled with complex musical and emotional interplay like "The Milk of Human Tenderness," which is both deeply personal and more abstractly philosophical as Sadier sings to and about her dead sister (whose passing inspired her solo debut, The Trip). Whenever the album threatens to become too meditative, she balances it with one of the more direct moments that make for Something Shines' immediate highlights. "Butter Side Up" moves from drifting to driving in its second half, and while its refrain "we need answers!" could seem too obvious coming from another artist, Sadier makes it sound both authoritative and refreshing. Likewise, "Then I Will Love You Again" allows her to put a poetic spin on the choice between responsibility and heartache. However, the album's most striking moment may be "Oscuridad," a stripped-down, scathing call to arms in the class war in which she spits out "rich" like it's a dirty word. While not all of Something Shines is this raw, listeners who take the time to absorb the album's deeper meanings as well as its surface beauty will find it another rewarding addition to Sadier's body of work.



Laetitia Sadier - Something Shines (flac  246mb)

01 Quantum Soup 6:57
02 Then I Will Love You Again 2:52
03 The Milk Of Human Tenderness 3:11
04 The Scene Of The Lie 5:26
05 Release From The Centre Of Your Heart 2:56
06 Butter Side Up 6:36
07 Transhumance 4:07
08 Echo Port 3:52
09 Oscuridad 3:19
10 Life Is Winning 5:53

Laetitia Sadier - Something Shines  (ogg  93mb)

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Refried Ectoplasm: Switched On, Vol. 2 collects 13 singles and rarities Stereolab released between 1992 and 1995, and it is far more than a mere oddities collection. More than any other album, Refried Ectoplasm charts Stereolab's astonishing musical growth between those three years, and offers several definitive songs -- including "Lo Boob Oscillator," "French Disko," and "John Cage Bubblegum" -- not available on any album. While such items are essential for collectors, the quality and accessibility of the music is very strong, showcasing Stereolab's complexity and providing an excellent introduction to the group.



Stereolab - Refried Ectoplasm (Switched On Volume 2) (flac  411mb)

01 The Noise Of Carpet (US Single) 3:07
02 The Free Design 3:46
03 Les Yper Yper Sound 5:18
04 Pain Et Spectacles 3:31
05 Ping Pong 3:03
06 Long Life Love 7:06
07 Jenny Ondioline (Alternate Version) 6:08
08 Heavy Denim 2:50
09 Brigitte 5:47
10 Miss Modular 4:13
11 Soop Groove #1 13:07

Stereolab - Refried Ectoplasm (Switched On Volume 2)  (ogg  142mb)

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Jan 13, 2018

RhoDeo 1801 Grooves

Hello,

Todays Artist was accurately dubbed "the Queen of Chicago blues" (and sometimes just the blues in general), she helped keep the tradition of big-voiced, brassy female blues belters alive, recasting the spirits of early legends like Bessie Smith, Ma Rainey, Big Mama Thornton, and Memphis Minnie for the modern age. Her rough, raw vocals were perfect for the swaggering new electrified era of the blues, and her massive hit "Wang Dang Doodle" served notice that male dominance in the blues wasn't as exclusive as it seemed. After a productive initial stint on Chess, she spent several decades on the prominent contemporary blues label Alligator, going on to win more W.C. Handy Awards than any other female performer in history, and establishing herself as far and away the greatest female blues singer of her time. . ........ N'joy

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Koko was born Cora Walton on September 28, 1928, on a sharecropper's farm in Memphis, TN. Her mother died in 1939, and she and her siblings grew up helping their father in the fields; she got the nickname "Koko" because of her love of chocolate. Koko began singing gospel music in a local Baptist church; inspired by the music they heard on the radio, she and her siblings also played blues on makeshift instruments. In 1953, Koko married truck driver Robert "Pops" Taylor and moved with him to Chicago to look for work; settling on the South Side, Pops worked in a slaughterhouse and Koko got a job as a housemaid. The Taylors often played blues songs together at night, and frequented the bustling South Side blues clubs whenever they could; Pops encouraged Koko to sit in with some of the bands, and her singing -- which reflected not only the classic female blues shouters, but contemporaries Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf -- quickly made a name for her. In 1962, Taylor met legendary Chess Records songwriter/producer/bassist Willie Dixon, who was so impressed with her live performance that he took her under his wing. He produced her 1963 debut single, "Honky Tonky," for the small USA label, then secured her a recording contract with Chess.

Taylor made her recording debut for Chess in 1964 and hit it big the following year with the Dixon-penned "Wang Dang Doodle," which sold over a million copies and hit number four on the R&B charts. It became her signature song forever after, and it was also the last Chess single to hit the R&B Top Ten. Demand for Taylor's live act skyrocketed, even though none of her follow-ups sold as well, and as the blues audience began to shift from black to white, the relatively new Taylor became one of the first Chicago blues artists to command a following on the city's white-dominated North Side. Eventually, she and her husband were able to quit their day jobs, and he served as her manager; she also put together a backing band called the Blues Machine. With the release of two albums -- 1969's Koko Taylor, which featured a number of her previous singles; and 1972's Basic Soul -- Taylor's live gigs kept branching out further and further from Chicago, and when she played the 1972 Ann Arbor Blues and Jazz Festival, the resulting live album on Atlantic helped bring her to a more national audience.

By the early '70s, Chess Records was floundering financially, and eventually went under in 1975. Taylor signed with a then-young Chicago-based label called Alligator, which grew into one of America's most prominent blues labels over the years. Taylor debuted for Alligator in 1975 with I Got What It Takes, an acclaimed effort that garnered her first Grammy nomination. Her 1978 follow-up, The Earthshaker, featured several tunes that became staples of her live show, including "I'm a Woman" and "Hey Bartender," and her popularity on the blues circuit just kept growing in spite of the music's commercial decline. In 1980, she won the first of an incredible string of W.C. Handy Awards (for Best Contemporary Female Artist), and over the next two decades, she would capture at least one more almost every year (save for 1989, 1997, and 1998). 1981 brought From the Heart of a Woman, and in 1984, Taylor won her first Grammy thanks to her appearance on Atlantic's various-artists compilation Blues Explosion, which was named Best Traditional Blues Album. She followed that success with the guest-laden Queen of the Blues in 1985, which won her a couple extra Handy Awards for Vocalist of the Year and Entertainer of the Year (no "female" qualifier attached). In 1987, she released her first domestic live album, Live in Chicago: An Audience With the Queen.

Tragedy struck in 1988. Taylor broke her shoulder, collarbone, and several ribs in a van accident while on tour, and her husband went into cardiac arrest; although Pops survived for the time being, his health was never the same, and he passed away some months later. After recuperating, Taylor made a comeback at the annual Chicago Blues Festival, and in 1990 she issued Jump for Joy, as well as making a cameo appearance in the typically bizarre David Lynch film Wild at Heart. Taylor followed it in 1993 with the aptly titled Force of Nature, after which she took a seven-year hiatus from recording; during that time, she remarried and continued to tour extensively, maintaining the stature she'd achieved with her '80s work as the living Queen of the Blues. In 2000, she finally returned with a new album, Royal Blue, which featured a plethora of guest stars: B.B. King, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Johnnie Johnson, and Keb' Mo'. Health issues forced another seven-year hiatus before she returned with the album Old School in 2007. Koko Taylor died in Chicago in June 2009 after experiencing complications from surgery for gastrointestinal bleeding. She was 80 years old.

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Another very credible outing, though Taylor's not quite convincing on the jazzily swinging "Sure Had a Wonderful Time Last Night." Far more suited to her raspy growl are her own "It Took a Long Time," a funky "Something Strange Is Going On," and Etta James's moving soul ballad "I'd Rather Go Blind" (beautifully complemented by Criss Johnson's liquidic guitar).



Koko Taylor - From The Heart Of A Woman    (flac  218mb)

01 Something Strange Is Going On 4:01
02 I'd Rather Go Blind 4:57
03 Keep Your Hands Off Him 3:49
04 Thanks, But No Thanks 4:14
05 If You Got A Heartache 3:42
06 Never Trust A Man 3:18
07 Sure Had A Wonderful Time Last Night 3:05
08 Blow Top Blues 4:15
09 If Walls Could Talk 3:30
10 It Took A Long Time 3:58

Koko Taylor - From The Heart Of A Woman  (ogg  90mb)

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Co-producer Bruce Iglauer anticipated a future trend by making this a set filled with cameos -- but the presence of Lonnie Brooks, James Cotton, Albert Collins, and Son Seals is entirely warranted and the contributions of each work quite well in the context of the whole. Taylor's gritty "I Cried like a Baby" and a snazzy remake of Ann Peebles' "Come to Mama" are among the many highlights.



Koko Taylor - Queen of The Blues   (flac 255mb)

01 Evil 4:58
02 Beer Bottle Boogie 3:33
03 I Cried Like A Baby 5:11
04 I Can Love You Like A Woman (Or I Can Fight You Like A Man) 3:48
05 Flamin' Mamie 3:27
06 Something Inside Me 3:43
07 The Hunter 3:26
08 Queen Bee 3:46
09 I Don't Care No More 3:08
10 Come To Mama 4:44

.Koko Taylor - Queen of The Blues  (ogg  94mb)

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Unfortunately, Koko Taylor's only domestic live album to date was cut with one of the lesser incarnations of her band, the Blues Machine, whose work could have displayed considerably more subtlety and swing than it does. Still, the set offers a vivid portrait of Chicago's blues queen in action, with faithful recitals of "Wang Dang Doodle," "I'm a Woman," and "Let the Good Times Roll."



Koko Taylor - An Audience With The Queen    (flac 294mb)

01 Let The Good Times Roll 4:00
02 I'm A Woman 5:53
03 Going Back To Iuka 4:29
04 The Devil's Gonna Have A Field Day 5:20
05 Come To Mama 4:54
06 I'd Rather Go Blind 4:30
07 Let Me Love You 4:11
08 Wang Dang Doodle 6:33

Koko Taylor - An Audience With The Queen  (ogg  121mb )

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A slightly slicker Koko Taylor than we've generally been accustomed to, with nice horn arrangements by Gene Barge that farme the blues queen's growl effectively. A Taylor duet with Lonnie Brooks would normally be something to savor, but they're saddled here with an extremely corny "It's a Dirty Job" that's beneath both their statures. Taylor wrote four of thet disc's best numbers herself, including "Can't Let Go" and the title cut.



Koko Taylor - Jump For Joy   (flac 268mb)

01 Can't Let Go 4:58
02 Stop Watching Your Enemies 5:18
03 Hey Baby 4:16
04 Tired Of That 5:50
05 It's A Dirty Job 4:20
06 Jump For Joy 4:20
07 Time Will Tell 4:46
08 The Eyes Don't Lie 3:43
09 Fishing Trip 5:27
10 I Don't Want No Leftovers 3:53

. Koko Taylor - Jump For Joy  (ogg  110mb)

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